0032560

In-Situ Conductivity Calibration Solutions

In-Situ 147 uS Calibration Solution

Description

In-Situ Conductivity Calibration Solutions are available in 1 liter bottles and are NIST traceable.

Features

  • Available in kits or individual bottles
  • Concentrations include 147, 1413, 12890, and 58670 uS/cm
  • For use with wide range of measurement from freshwater to seawater
Your Price
$45.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

Shipping Information
Return Policy
Why Buy From Fondriest?
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
In-Situ Conductivity Calibration Solutions 0032560 Conductivity calibration solution, 147 uS, 1L bottle
$45.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
In-Situ Conductivity Calibration Solutions 0020680 Conductivity calibration solution, 1413 uS, 1L bottle
$45.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
In-Situ Conductivity Calibration Solutions 0020690 Conductivity calibration solution, 12890 uS, 1L bottle
$45.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
In-Situ Conductivity Calibration Solutions 0032580 Conductivity calibration solution, 58,670 uS, 1L bottle
$45.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

Related Products

In The News

What is Conductivity?

UPDATE : Fondriest Environmental is offering their expertise in conductivity through their new online knowledge base. This resource provides an updated and comprehensive look at conductivity and why it is important to water quality. To learn more, check out: Conductivity, Salinity and TDS . Salinity and conductivity  measure the water's ability to conduct electricity, which provides a measure of what is dissolved in water. In the SWMP data, a higher conductivity value indicates that there are more chemicals dissolved in the water. Conductivity measures the water's ability to conduct electricity. It is the opposite of resistance. Pure, distilled water is a poor conductor of electricity.

Read More

Achieving Buy-in: The Importance of Community Involvement in Water Challenges

It's a fact that every resident of every state has a vested interest in water quality issues and the management of natural resources. However, too often the challenges posed by natural resource management are met by various battling groups of stakeholders with apparently different interests. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) is funding a research project called, “Securing Water for and From Agriculture Through Effective Community and Stakeholder Engagement,” and its participants are hoping that what they learn about achieving buy-in from various stakeholders and the community involvement that follows can help resolve some of these repeating conflicts.

Read More

Not a Drop to Drink: Plastic Pipes Leaching Chemicals Into Drinking Water

American concerns about drinking water are reaching critical mass. In March 2017, Gallup found that water pollution worries among Americans were at the highest they'd been since 2001, with 63 percent indicating they worry “a great deal” about pollution of drinking water, 57 percent worrying at that same level about the pollution of the waterways, and low-income and non-white Americans feeling more concerned about water pollution than their more economically advantaged, white counterparts. In May, another study was conducted by Nestle Waters, “Perspectives on American Waters.

Read More