LI-COR Sensor Millivolt Adapters

LI-COR Sensor Millivolt Adapters


The LI-COR sensor millivolt adapters terminate in bare leads for connection to data loggers and stripchart recorders.


  • 147 Ohm resistor for LI-200SA sensors
  • 604 Ohm resistor for LI-190SA, LI-191SA & LI-210SA sensors
  • 1210 Ohm resistor for LI-192SA & LI-193SA sensors
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Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
LI-COR Sensor Millivolt Adapters 2220 Sensor millivolt adapter (147 Ohm resistor), for use with LI-200R-BNC sensors In Stock
LI-COR Sensor Millivolt Adapters 2290 Sensor millivolt adapter (604 Ohm resistor), for use with LI-190R-BNC, LI-191R-BNC & LI-210R-BNC sensors
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LI-COR Sensor Millivolt Adapters 2291 Sensor millivolt adapter (1210 Ohm resistor), for use with LI-192SA & LI-193SA sensors
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In The News

LI-COR PAR sensors detect light waves to aid aquatic ecosystem research

Understanding how the sun’s rays fuel phytoplankton or plant growth may prove valuable to understanding an aquatic ecosystem. A pair of sensors from LI-COR can help researchers studying algal blooms and aquatic vegetation by measuring how much light enters underwater environments. Sitting below the surface, the LI-192 flat-lensed photosynthetically active radiation sensor and the LI-193 spherical PAR sensor measure light waves striking their silicon photovoltaic detectors.  They sense light wavelengths between 400 and 700 nanometers, which is the ideal range for photosynthesis. Dave Johnson, a LI-COR product manager for the LI-190 series, said the sensors’ individual designs make them ideal for different applications.

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Ohio State greenhouse nurtures 'fruit fly of the plant world'

The Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center at Ohio State University was established in 1991 with funding from the National Science Foundation. Part of the center’s job is to meet demand for seed of the arabidopsis plant, which is widely used for genetic modeling. “A lot of the plants we’re growing are for seed production,” said Joan Leonard, greenhouse coordinator. “Arabidopsis is a good example. We call it the ‘fruit fly of the plant world,’ and it takes about six to eight weeks to go from seed to plant.” Arabidopsis is one of the many plants that will benefit from a new LI-COR PAR sensor being installed on campus. It will help manage light schedules for greenhouse plants.

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White Bear Lake Stands Out In Study Of Twin Cities Lakes

Following water level declines in lakes around the Twin Cities area of Minnesota, scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey were interested in identifying the cause. What they found along with that was a large degree of variability between the lakes, based on geology, elevation and land use. That there was such variation isn’t too surprising, as Mother Nature is far from neat in laying things out. But the sheer size and scope of the study has a nice way of underscoring just how different individual lakes can be from one another even if they sit nearby. The effort, looking at 96 different lakes around Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minn., found wide variation in water levels over time. Some lakes gained in water levels while others nearby saw them decline.

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