Lowrance HOOK-4 Combos

Lowrance HOOK-4 Combos


The Lowrance HOOK-4 Combo combines the benefits of CHIRP Sonar and DownScan Imaging technology to give you a clear and complete view of the underwater environment beneath your boat.


  • Lowrance-Exclusive, Brilliant, High-Resolution, 5" Color Display
  • CHIRP Sonar Plus DownScan Imaging: The Power Of Today's Leading Fishfinder Technologies Combined To Provide The Best Possible View Beneath Your Boat
  • Highly accurate, built-in GPS antenna plus a detailed U.S. map featuring more than 3,000 lakes and rivers and coastal contours to 1,000 feet
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Why Buy From Fondriest?


 It features enhanced sonar sensitivity, excellent target separation and superior noise rejection, making it easier to see baitfish and gamefish targets. With a built-in GPS antenna and proven navigation features, revisiting your favorite fishing spot is simple with the Hook-4, whether you use the base map, optional high definition chart upgrades, or your own Insight Genesis custom maps.


  • Optional Americas chart upgrades include Lake Insight™ and Nautic Insight™ PRO and HD, Navionics HotMaps® Premium and Fishing Hotspots® PRO. Global chart upgrade options include Navionics +
  • Use your Insight Genesis™ custom maps created from your own sonar logs
  • DownScan Overlay™ technology overlays DownScan Imaging onto CHIRP Sonar
  • Advanced Signal Processing (ASP) reduces the need to manually adjust settings to see fish, structure and bottom detail more clearly
  • TrackBack™ to review recorded sonar history including structure, transitions or fish targets, then pinpoint locations with a waypoint
  • Convenient Page selector menu with quick access to all features using one-thumb operation
  • Multi-Window Display lets you quickly choose from pre-set page layouts - including a three-panel view


  • Display :4.3" / 109.22mm
  • Resolution :M16-bit color TFT 480 x 272
  • Backlighting :LED
  • Power Output: Max 500W RMS
  • Operating Frequency :455/800 kHz (DownScan Imaging™'), Med, High (CHIRP), 83kHz/200kHz
  • Languages:14
  • Media Port:One (1) microSD slot
  • Operating Voltage:12 VDC (10-17 VDC min-max)
  • Warranty:One year


  • Max Depth per Type:
  • DownScan Imaging™ at 455 kHz: Max 300' / 91M
  • CHIRP Sonar High Range/200 kHz: 1,000' / 305M
  • CHIRP Sonar Med Range/83 kHz: 1000' / 305M
  • Depth Alarm:Yes
  • Shallow Alarm:Yes
  • Temperature Readings:Yes
  • Transducer Type:83/200/455/800 HDI Transom Mount Transducer


  • Display Resolution:480 x 272
  • Display Type:16-bit color TFT
  • Display Backlighting:LED
  • Backlighting Levels:Adjustable Screen And Keypad
  • Display Size:4.3" / 109.22mm


  • Waterproof Standard/rating: IPx7
  • Product Width: 3.8" \ 96mm
  • Product Depth: 2.2" \ 56mm
  • Product Height: 6.6" \ 168mm (7.5" \ 189mm with bracket)

GPS Navigation

  • Routes storage:100
  • Waypoint Storage :3000
  • GPS Antenna Type:Internal high-sensitivity WAAS + EGNOS + MSAS (optional external antenna)
  • Plot Trail storage:Up to 100 trails - up to 10,000 points/trail
  • GPS Alarms:Yes
  • Custom Mapping:Optional Americas chart upgrades include Lake Insight™ and Nautic Insight™ PRO, Navionics HotMaps® Premium and Fishing Hotspots® PRO. Global chart upgrade options include Navionics +
  • Background Mapping:World reference basemap plus over 3,000 enhanced U.S. lake maps with depth contour and shoreline detail, and U.S. coastal depth contours/shoreline detail and spot depth soundings to 1,000' /305M
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Lowrance HOOK-4 Combos 000-12647-001 HOOK-4 Combo, with 83/200/455/800 HDI Transom Mount Transducer
In Stock
Lowrance HOOK-4 Combo w/83/200/455/800 HDI Transom Mount Transducer & Navionics+ Chart 000-12649-001 HOOK-4 Combo, with 83/200/455/800 HDI Transom Mount Transducer & Navionics+ Chart
In Stock

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