Marinco EEL 50A 125V/250V Shore Power Cordsets

Marinco EEL 50A 125V/250V Shore Power Cordsets


The Marinco EEL 50A 125V/250V Shore Power Cordset has an industry first, jaw clamp design providing one-handed operation and a secure waterproof seal which completely eliminates the need for a locking ring.


  • Designed For Use With Standard Inlets (NEMA)
  • Cord Sets Meet Global Industry Standards Including ABYC And UL
  • New Wing-Clamp Technology Provides A True, Watertight Connection Everytime
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Why Buy From Fondriest?


The EEL connection is built for the harshest environments and is UL approved. This easy-to-use cordset features a built-in cord light which serves as an alert to boaters when the cord is left plugged in. And, best of all, it works with your current inlet. In addition to cordsets with the EEL System, Marinco also has a full set of Pigtail and Y adapters all using the new EEL technology.


  • Single-handed operation
  • Eliminates the need for a sealing ring
  • Secondary locking feature for added security
  • Built-in LED cord light guides you to a secure connection every time, even in the dark


Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Marinco EEL 50A 125V/250V Shore Power Cordsets CS504-25 EEL 50A 125V/250V Shore Power Cordsets, Yellow, 25'
In Stock
Marinco CS504-50 EEL 50A 125V/250V Shore Power Cordset - 50' - Yellow CS504-50 EEL 50A 125V/250V Shore Power Cordset, Yellow, 50'
In Stock

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