Mustang Deluxe Auto Inflatable PFD Law Enforcement Edition - Navy Blue w/Back Flap

Mustang Deluxe Auto Inflatable PFD Law Enforcement Edition - Navy Blue w/Back Flap
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Deluxe Auto Inflatable PFD Law Enforcement Edition - Navy Blue w/Back Flap

Our line of Deluxe Inflatable PFDs combine the advanced safety of inflatable technology with product enhancements such as a safety inspection window to easily tell users if the inflator is ready for use. The Velcro(TM) closure makes it easy to wear and maintain while closing to the outside to reduce chafing around the neck and chest, a back flap can be silk screened with department ID. The MD3087 LE automatically inflates when the wearer is immersed in water and is lightweight and close-fitting to ensure it doesn't interfere with regular activities.

Automatic-activated inflatable PFDs inflate when they are immersed in water. They operate on a small tablet that dissolves in the water and causes the inflator to activate and fill the inflatable cell. They are an ideal choice for situations where you don't expect to go in the water - such as sailing or powerboating - but want the confidence that if the unexpected happens, the PFD will inflate within seconds of being in the water to keep you afloat.

Recommend for:
Law Enforcement
USCG - UL1180 - Inflatable PFDs 160.076 - Type II

  • Automatic inflation - inflates when immersed in water or when user pulls activation cord
  • Safety inspection window allows user to inspect inflator status: green indicates inflator is ready for use
  • Lightweight design for high mobility and allows PFD to be easily worn over a shirt or jacket
  • Durable nylon construction
  • 35lb buoyancy
  • Back flap can be silk screened with department ID
  • Neoprene Comfort Collar™
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Mustang Deluxe Auto Inflatable PFD Law Enforcement Edition - Navy Blue w/Back Flap MD3087LE-5 MUSTANG DELUXE AUTO INFLATABLE PFD LAW ENFORCEMENT EDITION
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