MD3075

Mustang Inflatable Belt Pack PFDs

Mustang Inflatable Belt Pack PFDs

Description

The Mustang Inflatable Belt Pack PFDs are easy to wear and maintain to stay out of the way until they are needed.

Features

  • Oral inflation tube included on product as secondary inflation option
  • SOLAS reflective tape for increased visibility in rescue conditions
  • Lightweight, ergonomic fit
List Price
$124.99
Your Price
$100.75
In Stock

Shipping Information
Return Policy
Why Buy From Fondriest?

Details

The Inflatable Belt Pack PFD from Mustang Survival fits around the waist like a belt, staying out of the way until you pull the inflation cord. Redesigned to fit and feel better with a great new look.

The ergonomic design conforms to the body to provide a secure and comfortable fit and is backed with Mustang's neoprene Comfort Lining™ to reduce chafing when worn against the skin. The PFD operates by manual inflation, meaning it won't inflate unless you pull the activation cord. Easy to wear and maintain, it inflates to provide 35lb buoyancy, more than twice the flotation of a traditional foam PFD.

A great option for those looking for minimal bulk and wanting to control when their PFD inflates. Recommended for paddlers, paddleboarders, river fishermen and general recreational boaters.

Recommend for:
Fishing, Boating, Paddle Sports, Industrial Marine, Law Enforcement

Approval:
USCG - UL1180 - Inflatable PFDs 160.076 - Type III

Features

  • Stays out of the way until activated
  • Manual inflation -inflates by pulling activation cord
  • 35lb buoyancy when inflated - more than 2x traditional foam PFDs
  • Easy inspection and maintenance with inflator inspection window - green means it's ready to go!
  • Safety whistle
  • Reflective piping on outer shell
  • Belt extender is available (MA7637)
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Mustang Inflatable Belt Pack PFDs MD3075 Inflatable belt pack PFD, black/carbon
$100.75
In Stock
Additional Product Information:

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