53656

Nalgene Square Wide Mouth Sampling Bottles

Nalgene Square Wide Mouth Sampling Bottles

Description

Made of High-Density Polyethylene, these durable, general-purpose bottles can be used in the lab or field.

Features

  • Excellent chemical resistance to most acids, bases, and alcohols
  • Good for freezer use to -100 degrees C
  • Suitable for shipping liquids
Your Price
$6.85
Usually ships in 3-5 days

Shipping Information
Return Policy
Why Buy From Fondriest?

Details

Made of High-Density Polyethylene (HDPE), these durable, general-purpose bottles can be used for countless applications in the lab or field because they are translucent and more rigid than LDPE.

The wide mouth makes it easy to fill with dry materials or liquids. The bottle offers excellent chemical resistance to most acids, bases, and alcohols. The bottle can be frozen to -100 degrees C and is suitable for shipping liquids.
What's Included:
  • (1) Square wide mouth sampling bottle
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Nalgene Square Wide Mouth Sampling Bottles 53656 Square wide mouth sampling bottle, 250mL
$6.85
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Nalgene Square Wide Mouth Sampling Bottles 53657 Square wide mouth sampling bottle, 500mL
$9.83
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Nalgene Square Wide Mouth Sampling Bottles 53658 Square wide mouth sampling bottle, 1000mL
$14.31
In Stock

In The News

Hippo Dung Revealed As Important Food Source In African Rivers

Few studies have looked at the effects hippos have on the water quality of streams. And the reason is simple: Studying near hippos isn’t safe. “It’s an ornery animal to work with,” said Doug McCauley, assistant professor of ecology, evolution and marine biology at the University of California, Santa Barbara, who just completed a study measuring the effects of hippo dung on the ecosystem of an African river. “When you’re sampling in a stream with salmon, there’s no threat that a salmon would bite you in half.” But for studies near gigantic hippos, the threat of danger is very real.

Read More

Road salt runoff flowing into streams near Cornell approaches ocean-like salinity

Salt applied to roads during the winter has an unsettling tendency to stick around long after the ice has melted. What’s more, it can make the runoff flowing into nearby streams almost as salty as the ocean, according to a recent study. A student-led effort at Cornell University made the discovery after another investigation looking into nitrogen concentrations uncovered oddly high conductivity levels in a plot of soil near a campus parking lot. Researchers say the results of the investigation will help fill in the blanks in long-term data sets on chloride levels in streams near Ithaca, New York, and may help to start a conversation on tackling problems that road salt creates.

Read More

Lake Michigan Yellow Perch Bounce Back After Commercial Ban

For decades, commercial fishing for yellow perch was allowed in southern Lake Michigan. This persisted until 1996 when it was outlawed, giving perch stocks there some time to recover. Scientists had for some time assumed that this fishing ban would not affect the reproduction cycles of the perch quickly and that they were going to need a long time to revert back to the cycles they relied on before commercial fishing ever started. But new research led by scientists at Purdue University finds that maturation schedules of yellow perch in southern Lake Michigan are much more resilient than had been previously thought possible.

Read More