NavPod GP1608 SystemPod Pre-Cut f/Simrad GO7/B&G Vulcan 7 & 2 Instruments f/9.5 Wide Guard

NavPod GP1608 SystemPod Pre-Cut f/Simrad GO7/B&G Vulcan 7 & 2 Instruments f/9.5 Wide Guard
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GP1608 SystemPod Pre-Cut For Simrad GO7/B&G Vulcan 7 & 2 Instruments for 9.5" Wide Guard

Instrument Cut Out Size: 3.6" Hole

GP1600 Series for 9.5" Guard, SystemPods are for mounting multiple pieces of electronics in one NavPod. This is a good way to reduce the height of a system. In addition to mounting a radar or chartplotter, you can have room for an autopilot, instrument, stereo controller, or VHF mic. A SystemPod is best mounted on a Single Bend AngleGuards.

The Hi-Gloss Material
  • NavPods are manufactured with a custom co-extruded acrylic capped ABS material. We use the absolute best UV resistant material that provides a very high gloss white finish that matches gel-coated fiberglass. The Gen3 enhancements now include a thicker gauge material that improves strength and provides for better structural rigidity.

The Waterproof Seal
  • All NavPods are manufactured with a double gasket system providing an excellent watertight seal between the front and back of the NavPod for protection of your Marine Electronics. NavPods are made to withstand the harshest of wet offshore boating conditions. Gen3 enhancements include a thicker external silicone gasket with improved flush fit. The internal EPDM gasket is now 50% thicker and is not subject to "compression set" like many rubber compounds. This is important when you need to open the NavPod in the future to service your electronics.

The Nickel Chrome Plated Screws
  • We use all stainless steel mounting hardware that is supplied with each NavPod. Large round head tamperproof screws have deeper sockets for the NavPod wrench for better holding ability when tightening than the previous screws. For Gen3 we provide nickel chrome-plated stainless steel tamperproof screws for security combined with a little bling!

The Manufacturing Process
  • Heavy-gauge thermoforming is considered an art since many processes come into play. It all starts with the design and development of the tooling. We are fortunate to have experienced in-house design engineers who utilize CAD programs like Solidworks, Catia and AutoCad. Surfcam is used to interface with our CNC machining centers to produce quality tools with precision tolerances.

Our Commitment to Quality
  • We are committed to producing the best possible waterproof housing for Marine Electronics. Now with two decades of experience under our belt, we are confident you will have years of trouble free service and a long lasting high gloss finish. We will stand behind our commitment by now offering a 10-year warranty on all new Gen3 NavPods.
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
NavPod GP1608 SystemPod Pre-Cut f/Simrad GO7/B&G Vulcan 7 & 2 Instruments f/9.5 Wide Guard GP1608 NAVPOD GP1608 SYSTEMPOD PRE-CUT FOR SIMRAD GO7 B&G
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