Los Angeles emissions cuts take the sting out of smog

By on June 10, 2013
Smog in Los Angeles in 1973 (Credit: Gene Daniels, National Archives and Records Administration)

A study led by researchers from the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado Boulder has shown that the reduction of tailpipe emissions in the Los Angeles area has both reduced ozone pollution and organic nitrate in the region’s atmosphere, the American Geophysical Union has reported.

Scientists analyzed recent air quality measurements from research aircraft and archived data from roadside monitors and ground-based instruments generated over the past 50 years.

The data showed a correlation between emission restrictions and overall air quality. The emission reductions have helped stifle organic nitrates, which cause eye irritation.

Image: Smog in Los Angeles in 1973 (Credit: Gene Daniels, National Archives and Records Administration)

About Adam Redling

Adam Redling is a contributing writer for the Environmental Monitor. He covers the latest news, studies and products in the field of environmental research.

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