Report suggests steps to cut nutrient runoff

By on March 11, 2013
Algal bloom resulting from runoff on Cedar Lake in Wisconsin (Credit: Wisconsin Department of Health Services)

William & Mary’s Virginia Institute of Marine Science has reported on a new university study that provides recommendations for managing the use of nitrogen and phosphorus throughout the world.

The study chronicles the sharp divide between developed nations that tend to overuse these nutrients as fertilizers, which then runoff into and pollute coastal waters, and developing nations that have a lack of such nutrients, which makes it difficult to effectively grow enough food for the populations’ needs.

The goal of the study is to increase the efficiency of nutrient use by 20 percent by 2020 through refined farming practices, more efficient use of fossil fuels and better coordination between global markets.

Image: Algal bloom resulting from runoff on Cedar Lake in Wisconsin (Credit: Wisconsin Department of Health Services)

About Adam Redling

Adam Redling is a contributing writer for the Environmental Monitor. He covers the latest news, studies and products in the field of environmental research.

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