Seagrass meadows could buffer ocean acidification effects

By on July 17, 2014
Seagrass growing in the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary (Credit: Claire Fackler/ NOAA CINMS)

Seagrass growing in the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary (Credit: Claire Fackler/ NOAA CINMS)

Ocean acidification could seriously impact marine life as the problem worsens, but scientists at the University of California, Santa Barbara, believe regions of underwater vegetation could provide a haven to acid-sensitive organisms, NPR reported.

Seagrass meadows absorb CO2 and seem to neutralize acidity, making them valuable buffers for coastal ecosystems where juvenile shellfish and other creatures are particularly vulnerable to the effects of acidification.

More research is needed to quantify the benefits of seagrass beds, but scientists are already experimenting with planting undersea meadows to protect fish and plants.

Image: Seagrass growing in the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary (Credit: Claire Fackler/ NOAA CINMS)

 

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One Comment

  1. Ellen Grace Gallares

    July 17, 2014 at 11:10 am

    I got interested with the article title. In my advocacy work for biodiversity conservation and promotion for ecotourism, I encountered a reclamation project that would wipe-out a huge area of seagrass bed. This indicates that only few have understood the role of seagrass. Your work is very valuable to back up with scientific data in our advocacy work.

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