DS1402

NexSens DS1402 iButton USB Reader

NexSens DS1402 iButton USB Reader

Description

The DS1402 USB reader provides a direct PC interface for iButton loggers. This allows the user to configure, deploy, view status, and upload data when used with compatible software.

Features

  • 8' USB extension cable provides versatility in configuring and uploading data
  • Plugs directly into any desktop or laptop USB port
  • Software automatically recognizes each unique logger when connected
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$49.95
In Stock

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Details

The DS1402 USB reader provides a direct PC interface for iButton loggers. This allows the user to configure, deploy, view status, and upload data when used with compatible software. The 8' USB extension cable provides versatility in configuring and uploading data.
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
NexSens DS1402 iButton USB Reader DS1402 iButton USB reader with 8' extension cable
$49.95
In Stock

In The News

A low-cost DIY iButton array tracks lake turnover for Missouri volunteers

When Howard Webb set out to monitor turnover in Whitecliff Quarry Lake, his custom-built system of temperature sensors worked perfectly. Until the muskrats showed up. Webb, a volunteer with the Lakes of Missouri Volunteer Program , devised an inexpensive array to monitor the lake in St. Louis’ Crestwood suburb. His design for looking at the effect of temperature turnover on algae cycling centered on iButtons, small metal loggers that were very reliable, but not waterproof. That meant Webb had to find an equally inexpensive way to keep them dry. The solution? Small Nalgene water bottles to hold the loggers. Muskrats, however, mistook the bottles - which became covered in algae - for food, tearing into them and flooding the iButtons. “We thought, ‘Let’s give this a try.

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Can Better Technologies Save Endangered California Salmon?

Up until the 1800s, salmon were so plentiful in California that these “ bits of silver pulled out of the water ” could be observed ascending the waterways, thousands at a time, each season. However, decades of logging, the construction of dams, and other human interventions have changed the waterways of the state so significantly that the range of the salmon has been permanently altered. Now, a team of scientists collaborating through the Interagency Ecological Program have developed a plan to improve salmon management and, hopefully, help save the species. Team members from NOAA Fisheries, the California Department of Water Resources, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, and the U.S.

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