DS1402

NexSens DS1402 iButton USB Reader

NexSens DS1402 iButton USB Reader

Description

The DS1402 USB reader provides a direct PC interface for iButton loggers. This allows the user to configure, deploy, view status, and upload data when used with compatible software.

Features

  • 8' USB extension cable provides versatility in configuring and uploading data
  • Plugs directly into any desktop or laptop USB port
  • Software automatically recognizes each unique logger when connected
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$49.95
In Stock

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Details

The DS1402 USB reader provides a direct PC interface for iButton loggers. This allows the user to configure, deploy, view status, and upload data when used with compatible software. The 8' USB extension cable provides versatility in configuring and uploading data.
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
NexSens DS1402 iButton USB Reader DS1402 iButton USB reader with 8' extension cable
$49.95
In Stock

In The News

A low-cost DIY iButton array tracks lake turnover for Missouri volunteers

When Howard Webb set out to monitor turnover in Whitecliff Quarry Lake, his custom-built system of temperature sensors worked perfectly. Until the muskrats showed up. Webb, a volunteer with the Lakes of Missouri Volunteer Program , devised an inexpensive array to monitor the lake in St. Louis’ Crestwood suburb. His design for looking at the effect of temperature turnover on algae cycling centered on iButtons, small metal loggers that were very reliable, but not waterproof. That meant Webb had to find an equally inexpensive way to keep them dry. The solution? Small Nalgene water bottles to hold the loggers. Muskrats, however, mistook the bottles - which became covered in algae - for food, tearing into them and flooding the iButtons. “We thought, ‘Let’s give this a try.

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Lake Michigan Yellow Perch Bounce Back After Commercial Ban

For decades, commercial fishing for yellow perch was allowed in southern Lake Michigan. This persisted until 1996 when it was outlawed, giving perch stocks there some time to recover. Scientists had for some time assumed that this fishing ban would not affect the reproduction cycles of the perch quickly and that they were going to need a long time to revert back to the cycles they relied on before commercial fishing ever started. But new research led by scientists at Purdue University finds that maturation schedules of yellow perch in southern Lake Michigan are much more resilient than had been previously thought possible.

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Colorado River Fish Contain Levels Of Selenium, Mercury

Largely seen as pristine and relatively untouched by human activity thanks to its protected status, the portion of the Colorado River flowing through Grand Canyon National Park is anything but, according to recently published research. This is evidenced by high levels of selenium and mercury found in the fishes there. Scientists from many institutions were involved in the years-long work, full results of which have been published in the journal Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry. It was led by the U.S. Geological Survey, but perhaps the contributors from Idaho State University got the best end of the stick. They were looking into the food webs of the river to evaluate concentrations of selenium and mercury gathering in fish.

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