DS9093N

NexSens DS9093N iButton Keychain Fob

NexSens DS9093N iButton Keychain Fob

Description

Keychain Fobs offer a simple way to carry iButton temperature loggers. Simply snap the temperature logger into the keychain hole, and it's ready to go.

Features

  • Each pack comes with (5) Keychain Fobs for use with multiple iButton loggers
  • Fobs can easily be attached to car keys, wall hooks, rope, etc.
  • iButton loggers can interface to the PC while still attached to the Keychain Fobs
Your Price
$14.95
Usually ships in 3-5 days

Shipping Information
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Why Buy From Fondriest?

Details

This is a low cost and effective way to mount the iButton logger. The holder can then be attached to car keys, wall hooks, rope, etc. It can also be used as a convenient way to transport temperature loggers on person. When used with the DS1402 USB adapter, iButton loggers can interface to the PC without removing them from the keychain.
What's Included:
  • (5) iButton keychain fobs
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
NexSens DS9093N iButton Keychain Fob DS9093N iButton keychain fob, 5 pack
$14.95
Usually ships in 3-5 days

In The News

A low-cost DIY iButton array tracks lake turnover for Missouri volunteers

When Howard Webb set out to monitor turnover in Whitecliff Quarry Lake, his custom-built system of temperature sensors worked perfectly. Until the muskrats showed up. Webb, a volunteer with the Lakes of Missouri Volunteer Program , devised an inexpensive array to monitor the lake in St. Louis’ Crestwood suburb. His design for looking at the effect of temperature turnover on algae cycling centered on iButtons, small metal loggers that were very reliable, but not waterproof. That meant Webb had to find an equally inexpensive way to keep them dry. The solution? Small Nalgene water bottles to hold the loggers. Muskrats, however, mistook the bottles - which became covered in algae - for food, tearing into them and flooding the iButtons. “We thought, ‘Let’s give this a try.

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