DS9096P

NexSens DS9096P iButton Adhesive Pads

NexSens DS9096P iButton Adhesive Pads

Description

Adhesive Pads provide a low-cost option for securing iButton loggers to various environments.

Features

  • Rugged adhesive provides long-term monitoring solution in most interior and exterior applications
  • Double-coated acrylic VHB foam tape attaches to virtually any smooth surface
  • Each pack comes with (12) Adhesive Pads for use with multiple iButton loggers
Your Price
$4.95
In Stock

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Details

NexSens Adhesive Pads are made of white, double-coated acrylic VHB foam tape that is die-cut to match the diameter of iButton loggers. The pads allow iButton's to be attached to virtually any smooth surface, offering an excellent long-term monitoring solution in most interior and exterior applications.
What's Included:
  • (12) iButton adhesive pads
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
NexSens DS9096P iButton Adhesive Pads DS9096P iButton adhesive pads, 12 ea.
$4.95
In Stock

In The News

A low-cost DIY iButton array tracks lake turnover for Missouri volunteers

When Howard Webb set out to monitor turnover in Whitecliff Quarry Lake, his custom-built system of temperature sensors worked perfectly. Until the muskrats showed up. Webb, a volunteer with the Lakes of Missouri Volunteer Program , devised an inexpensive array to monitor the lake in St. Louis’ Crestwood suburb. His design for looking at the effect of temperature turnover on algae cycling centered on iButtons, small metal loggers that were very reliable, but not waterproof. That meant Webb had to find an equally inexpensive way to keep them dry. The solution? Small Nalgene water bottles to hold the loggers. Muskrats, however, mistook the bottles - which became covered in algae - for food, tearing into them and flooding the iButtons. “We thought, ‘Let’s give this a try.

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University of Toronto Doctoral Student Sees Environmental Monitoring Future in Internet of Things

Researchers face many difficulties. Assessing the ecological health of large geographic regions, especially those with a low population and few research facilities, is one of the many challenges scientists face. One such region is the Ottawa River in Canada, nearly 800 miles long with an overall drainage area of 55,000 square miles. Not only is it vast, but there are few human inhabitants and few research outposts. While gathering representative water samples in such a region is difficult enough, there is also the challenge of responding in a timely manner when problems arise.

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