NexSens DS9096P iButton Adhesive Pads

NexSens DS9096P iButton Adhesive Pads


Adhesive Pads provide a low-cost option for securing iButton loggers to various environments.


  • Rugged adhesive provides long-term monitoring solution in most interior and exterior applications
  • Double-coated acrylic VHB foam tape attaches to virtually any smooth surface
  • Each pack comes with (12) Adhesive Pads for use with multiple iButton loggers
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Why Buy From Fondriest?


NexSens Adhesive Pads are made of white, double-coated acrylic VHB foam tape that is die-cut to match the diameter of iButton loggers. The pads allow iButton's to be attached to virtually any smooth surface, offering an excellent long-term monitoring solution in most interior and exterior applications.
What's Included:
  • (12) iButton adhesive pads
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
NexSens DS9096P iButton Adhesive Pads DS9096P iButton adhesive pads, 12 ea.
Usually ships in 3-5 days

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