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iSIC-MAST

NexSens iSIC-MAST Data Logging System

NexSens iSIC-MAST Data Logging System

Description

The iSIC-MAST system includes the data logger and solar panel pre-mounted to a 2" diameter pole to create a truly plug-and-play data collection and sensor interface platform.

Features

  • Arrives fully assembled, tested, and operational for quick & portable field installations
  • Self-charging system with built-in 8.5 A-Hr battery for reliable extended deployments
  • System easily threads to pre-installed 2" NPT pipe using include female coupling
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$2,795.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days

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Details

The iSIC-MAST system includes the data logger and solar panel pre-mounted to a 2" diameter pole to create a truly plug-and-play data collection and sensor interface platform. The system integrates a NexSens iSIC data logger and 20-watt solar power kit - all in a compact, pre-configured package. Simply thread the system to any 2" NPT male pipe thread, connect the solar panel & battery, wire the sensors, and setup a project using iChart software - it's that simple!

The iSIC data logger arrives ready for long-term deployment. All electronics are housed in a rugged, NEMA 4X enclosure constructed of heavy-duty fiberglass. The built-in 8.5 amp-hour sealed lead acid battery provides 12 volt power to the system, and the battery is continuously charged using solar power. Polymer-coated circuit boards, sealed connectors, corrosion-resistant stainless steel hardware, and built-in lightning protection ensure reliable performance in the harshest conditions. All sensors are cabled through Sealcon gland fittings to ensure protection from the elements.

NexSens iChart Software is a Windows-based program for interfacing to an iSIC data logger or network of data loggers. The iChart Setup Device Wizard includes built-in drivers and a step-by-step interface for setting up and configuring remote monitoring sensors and systems. When connected, the user can quickly configure sample & log intervals, upload data, or troubleshoot communications.
Notable Specifications:
  • Analog Inputs: (4) differential or (8) single-ended, additional (4) differential or (8) single-ended optional, 0-2.5 V auto range, 12-bit resolution
  • Analog Outputs: (1) 12-bit channel, 0-2.5 V programmable
  • Power Outputs: (1) 12 V 250 mA configurable switch, (1) 5 V 50 mA analog excitation voltage, (1) 12 V output, fused from battery
  • Pulse Counters: (1) tipping bucket counter, max rate: 10 Hz
  • Digital I/O Ports: (2) standard generic I/O ports
  • 1-Wire Interface: (1) 1-wire temperature sensor port
  • SDI-12 Interface: (1) SDI-12 port
  • RS-485 Interface: (1) RS-485 port
  • RS-232 Interface: (3) RS-232 sensor ports, (3) additional optional
  • Host Interface: (1) RS-232 or (1) RS-485 port configurable
  • Supported Serial Communication Protocols: NMEA 0183 or Modbus RTU
  • Internal Memory: 2 MB Flash memory, over 500,000 data points minimum
  • Power Requirements: Voltage: 10.7 to 16 VDC
  • Typical Current Draw: Data Logger: 2.5 mA sleep, 10 mA processing, 36 mA analog measurement; Cellular Modem: 350 mA receive/transmit typical, 104 mA idle; Radio Modem: 86 mA receive, 500 mA transmit, 21 mA idle,< 1 mA power off; Wi-Fi Modem: 92mA continuous; Ethernet Modem: 120mA transmit/receive, 82mA idle; Satellite Modem: 550-850mA transmit, 80mA standby, 30uA sleep
  • Battery: 12 V 8.5 A-Hr battery, internal
  • Temperature Range: -20 to +70 C
  • Dimensions: NEMA 4X Enclosure: 12" x 8.5" x 6.95"
  • Compatible Sensors: 4-20 mA sensors, 0-2.5 V sensors, SDI-12 sensors, RS-232 sensors, RS-485 sensors, Modbus RTU sensors, NMEA 0183 sensors, 1-Wire temperature sensors, Thermistor sensors, Tipping bucket rain gauges
  • Cellular Protocol: GSM/GPRS, EDGE, CDMA
  • Supported Cellular Carriers: AT&T, Verizon, Sprint
  • Radio Frequency Range: 902-928 MHz
  • Radio Communication Range: 40 miles line of sight, extended range with repeaters
  • Satellite Frequency Range: 1616-1626.5 MHz
What's Included:
  • (1) iSIC data logger
  • (1) A22 20-watt solar power kit
  • (1) A55 Pole/wall mounting kit
  • (1) MAST 2" NPT aluminum Pole, 24" length
  • (1) 2" NPT PVC pipe cap
  • (1) 2" NPT aluminum female pipe coupling
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
NexSens iSIC-MAST Data Logging System iSIC-MAST Mast-mounted iSIC data logging system with solar charging kit
$2795.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
NexSens A38 Ground Kit A38 Ground kit
$79.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
NexSens A38-P Pipe Attachment Ground Kit A38-P Ground kit, pipe attachment
$69.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
NexSens iSIC Data Logger Digital Expansion Digital-EXP iSIC digital expansion, 3 additional RS-232 inputs
$495.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
NexSens iSIC Data Logger Analog Expansion Analog-EXP iSIC analog expansion, 8 additional analog inputs
$495.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
NexSens iChart 6 Software 1001 iChart 6 software, licensed per computer
$895.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days

Questions & Answers

| Ask a Question
For turbidity monitoring, what type of sensor is suitable to attach to the iSIC-MAST logger?
The iSIC-MAST data logger is compatible with most turbidity sensors on the market. From our current offering, users can choose between the PONSEL DIGISENS turbidity sensor or the Turner Designs Cyclops-7 turbidity sensor. The iSIC-MAST data logger can also be integrated with the YSI 6-series or EXO sondes and their respective turbidity sensors.
What additional software is required to download the data?
The iSIC-MAST data logger is used with NexSens iChart Software. This is a Windows-based program that can access the data from a direct-connect cable.
Do I need the grounding kit?
The NexSens iSIC-MAST system does not need a grounding kit if it is mounted to a grounded metal pole. If it will be mounted to a different material, then a grounding kit is recommended.
Can the enclosure be locked?
Yes, the fiberglass enclosure can be padlocked without any additional modifications.

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