M-ARM-E

NexSens M-ARM-E Weather Sensor Mounting Arm

NexSens M-ARM-E Weather Sensor Mounting Arm

Description

The M-ARM-E mounting extension is used to mount Vaisala and RM Young meteorological sensors to 2" poles.

Features

  • 6" EMT pipe is used for quick and easy weather sensor attachments
  • 304 SS U-bolts provide corrosion resistant and durable pipe attachments
Your Price
$99.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days

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Details

The M-ARM-E is a custom-built, 3 ft. mounting extension designed for Vaisala and RM Young weather sensors. The EMT pipe complements manufacturer mounting fixtures, providing a perfect solution for weather sensor field installations. The aluminum unistrut arm includes all required parts for mounting to a 2" pole.
What's Included:
  • (1) 3' Aluminum slotted unistrut channel, 1-5/8" x 13/16"
  • (1) 6" EMT pipe for sensor mounting
  • (1) 304 SS U-bolt, 5/16"-18, for use with 1" pipes
  • (1) 304 SS U-bolt, 5/16"-18, for use with 2 pipes
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
NexSens M-ARM-E Weather Sensor Mounting Arm M-ARM-E Weather sensor mounting arm, 3 ft
$99.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Additional Product Information:

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