MLT02-07-01

Nite Ize MoonLit LED Area Light

Nite Ize MoonLit LED Area Light

Description

The Nite Ize MoonLit LED Area Light features a strong internal wire that holds its shape to illuminate from any angle.

Features

  • Glow and flash modes
  • Tough rubber shell provides excellent grip but won't scratch or mark
  • Water-resistant, long-life, replaceable batteries included
List Price
$10.79
Your Price
$9.32
In Stock

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Details

The Nite Ize MoonLit can be used and reused in countless configurations - it's an easy, handy way to shine ambient light from almost any angle. We've connected our famous SpotLit to a bendable, durable 18" Gear Tie, using a slimline stainless steel crimp connection. The long-lasting LED has two functions - steady glow and continuous flash - and emits light bright enough for reading fine print. Bend, wrap, or twist the MoonLit around tree limbs, tent poles, bed posts, or make a loop at one end and hang it from a hook for steady ambient overhead light. Set in flash mode and wrapped around bicycle handlebars, backpack straps, or even your arm, the MoonLit keeps you safely visible in the dark. Water-resistant, long-life, replaceable batteries included.

Features:

  • Bright White LED Area Light on the end of an 18" Gear Tie Reusable Rubber Twist Tie
  • Weather resistant
  • Push button switch
  • Glow and flash modes
  • Battery run time: Glow mode: 20 hours | Flash mode: 25 hours
  • Easily replaceable 2 x 2016 3V lithium battery included
    Gear Tie Technology
  • Tough rubber shell provides excellent grip but won't scratch or mark
  • Strong internal wire that holds its shape
  • Quick and easy to securely attach and detach
  • UV resistant - will not be damaged by extended sun exposure
  • Product Dimensions: 5.2" x 3.1" x .86" (132mm x 79mm x 21.9mm)
  • Product Weight: 29g /1oz
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Nite Ize MoonLit LED Area Light MLT02-07-01 MoonLit LED Area light
$9.32
In Stock
Additional Product Information:

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