1510012

Raritan Tank Monitor

Raritan Tank Monitor

Description

The Raritan Tank Monitor provides convenient, reliable, maintenance-free monitoring of one to four fresh, gray and waste water tanks.

Features

  • All Parts Mounted Outside Of The Tanks: Eliminates Need For Special Tank Fittings
  • Reliable Electronic Design Protected For The Marine Environment
  • Can Be Used With Any Polyethylene Or Fiberglass Fresh, Gray and Waste Water Tanks
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List Price
$510.00
Your Price
$388.73
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

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Details


All components are mounted outside of the tanks for dependable operation, eliminating the need for special tank fittings and the inevitable maintenance of internally mounted tank sensors. The tank monitor has no moving parts.

The indicator panel clearly displays a tank's contents (or reserve) by selecting the tank on the touch pad. The tank's content is displayed at quarter tank intervals (i.e. EMPTY, 1/4, 1/2, 3/4 and FULL) with easy to understand international symbol labels (which are provided). The Indicator Panel is rugged, flush mounted and has no protruding parts.

The tank module senses the contents of the tank and sends a signal to the indicator panel. The electronic components are completely encapsulated, protecting them from the harshest environments.

Benefits

  • Easy to use
  • No maintenance required
  • Gold-plated connectors ensure consistent and trouble free performance
  • Simple installation
  • Low power consumption
  • No internal probes or floats
  • Flush-mounted indicator panel has a smooth surface (no protruding switches or gauge)
  • Each unit is assembled by hand, individually tested and backed by Raritan's one-year Limited Warranty and legendary technical support team



For use on non-conductive tanks (polyethylene, fiberglass, etc.). NOT FOR USE ON FUEL TANKS

Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Raritan Tank Monitor 1510012 Tank Monitor, 12V
$388.73
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Additional Product Information:

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