YOUNG Electronic Compass

YOUNG Electronic Compass


The YOUNG 32500 Electronic Compass provides accurate "true" wind indication with serial data output for use with YOUNG wind sensors.


  • Electronic compass designed for use with YOUNG wind monitors
  • Digital signal is more resistant to electrical interference and errors from line losses
  • Each model is supplied in a weather-resistant enclosure
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Why Buy From Fondriest?


Ideal for mobile and portable applications, the RM Young 32500 Electronic Compass utilizes a solid state compass module for accurate magnetic heading data. The compass module is combined with high resolution interface circuitry to generate useful "true" wind data from the wind sensor. Auxiliary sensor inputs allow connection of other meteorological sensors such as temperature, humidity and barometric pressure sensors.

All analog signals are converted to serial format for clear transmission. The serial interface greatly simplifies connection of meteorological sensors to recording electronics with serial inputs. By transmitting the signal in serial form, sensor data can be carried over great distances using a minimum number of conductors. The digital signal is more resistant to electrical interference and errors from line losses. Model 32500 is supplied in a weather-resistant enclosure and comes with a mounting adapter to fit on the same vertical mast as RM Young wind sensors.
Notable Specifications:
  • Size: 4.75" (12cm) H x 2.87" (7.3cm) W x 2.12" (5.3cm) D
  • Resolution: 1 degree azimuth
  • Accuracy: +/-2 degrees RMS
  • Inputs: YOUNG wind sensors 2 channels, 0-1000 mV 2 channels, 0-5000 mV
  • Outputs: Serial RS232/RS485
  • Selectable formats: ASCII Text, NMEA, RMYT compatible with 06201 display
  • Operating Temperature: -50 C to +50 C
  • Power: 10 to 30 VDC, 30 mA
  • Mounting: 1" IPS (1.34" actual diameter)
  • Other: Self calibration mode for compass
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
YOUNG Electronic Compass 32500 Electronic compass with serial interface
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Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
YOUNG Sensor Cables 18446 Sensor cable, 5 conductor shielded, 22 AWG, per ft.
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