61002

YOUNG Pressure Port

YOUNG Pressure Port

Description

The YOUNG 61002 pressure port minimizes dynamic pressure errors due to wind.

Features

  • Dynamic Pressure Error: 0.5 hPa maximum @ 20 m/s
  • Dimensions: 11.5 cm (4.5 in) H x 13 cm (5.1 in) Dia.
  • Mounting: Offset bracket with U-bolt for 25 - 50 mm (1-2 in) pipe
Your Price
$162.00
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Details

Ambient wind of 20 meters per second blowing over a typical barometer inlet tube can cause pressure errors as high as 3 hPa. The RM Young 61002 pressure port minimizes these errors.
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
YOUNG Pressure Port 61002 Pressure port with offset bracket
$162.00
Drop ships from manufacturer
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