5101

Shakespeare 5101 8' VHF Antenna

Shakespeare 5101 8' VHF Antenna
List Price
$105.00
Your Price
$62.82
In Stock

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Details

Shakespeare CENTENNIAL™ Style 5101
8' LENGTH, VHF Marine 6dB

END-FED WITH MATCHING STUB
A new standard of excellence in an economical antenna! Shakespeare brings you the best of the high-end features in an 8' antenna with a brass element and a smooth, high gloss, polyurethane finish that wont turn yellow in the sun. This antenna delivers not only performance, but superb value.

  • Brass and copper elements
  • Chrome-plated brass ferrule with standard 1"-14 thread
  • Includes 15' RG-58 cable and a PL-259 connector
  • Suggested mount: Shakespeare Style 4187 Ratchet Mount, or use a Shakespeare Style 410-R Mounting Kit plus a Style 4008 Extension Mast to form a 16' antenna system
  • One section
  • Shakespeare Limited Warranty: 2 years


Technical Specifications:


Frequency:VHF Marine Band
Bandwidth:(within 2.0 1 SWR): 5 MHz
SWR:1.5:1 at 156.8 MHz
Impedance:(Ohms): 50
Gain:6 dB
Max. Input (Watts):50
DC Ground:YES - however, the antenna will read "open circuit" when tested with ohmeter.
Termination:15' RG-58 cable
Height (feet):8'
Polarization:Vertical
Radiation pattern:Omni - directional

Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Shakespeare 5101 8' VHF Antenna 5101 SHAKESPEARE VHF 8FT 5101 6DB
$62.82
In Stock

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