Shakespeare VHF 8' 6225-R Phase III Antenna - No Cable

Shakespeare VHF 8' 6225-R Phase III Antenna - No Cable
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VHF 8' 6225-R Phase III Antenna - No Cable

Embark upon your next voyage w/ the most technologically advanced antenna we've ever created...

Construction Goes High-Tech
Phase III antennas embody the ultimate in antenna design, construction and performance. We intend them for discerning, tech-conscious boaters who won't settle for less than the best, most versatile and most attractive antennas. For highest electrical efficiency, performance, and longevity, Phase III VHF and Cellular antennas start with silver-plated elements. They also feature Shakespeare's unique low-angle radiation that puts your signal where it matters most. All of our extra heavy-duty Phase III radomes are completely foam-filled. This sophisticated technique, which is no easy feat to manufacture, isolates the radiators from vibration and moisture for long, dependable service. Antenna mounting has also been designed for more versatility. Phase III's newly engineered ferrules accommodate a variety of installation possibilities, including standard 1" - 14 thread mounts, and strapping or clamping to a mast.

Collinear-phased 5/8-wave elements

Built for performance and durability, this flagship Phase III antenna won't mind high speeds and high winds. Its great looks will be welcome on your boat, and so will its reliability.

  • Silver-plated outer conductor, copper inner conductor
  • Stainless steel mounting sleeve
  • The connection is an SO239 which uses a standard PL259 connector
  • Suggested mount: Shakespeare Style 4187-HD Ratchet Mount
  • Max. Power Input: 150 watts
  • SWR: Less than 1.5:1 at 156.8 MHz
  • Bandwidth: 3 MHz within 2.0:1 VSWR
  • Frequency: VHF Marine Band
  • DC Gorunding: Yes
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Shakespeare VHF 8' 6225-R Phase III Antenna - No Cable 6225-R SHAKESPEARE VHF 8FT 6225 PHASE III ANTENNA NO CABLE
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