SI-TEX T-940-4 4kW 4.5' Open Array Radar

SI-TEX T-940-4 4kW 4.5' Open Array Radar
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T-900 Series
Digital Dual Range Radar

8.4" True-Color Daylight Viewable LCD Display!

SI-TEX's T-900 Series Radars feature new Hyper-Digital Processing™ (HDP) to provides real-time rotation with enhanced target discrimination. It virtually eliminates unwanted noise to provide a clearer detailed image of targets and enhances the detection of smaller targets.

  • Dual Range Radar function lets you view split-screen displays of both long and short-range targets simultaneously. Monitor a nearby buoy and a far off island at the same time.
  • Brilliant 8.4" color LCD daylight viewable display with 480 x 640 pixel resolution and anti-reflective glare coating for outstanding viewing.
  • True-color radar feature displays echoes in different color depending on signal strength.
  • True Trail function clearly identifies moving targets from stationary targets. The display shows exact movement of other vessels like drawing tails, while land and buoys are shown as stationary objects even while your vessel is moving.
  • Easy operation with dedicated control knobs for Gain and STC.
  • RGB output for connecting external monitor.
  • Accepts CCD camera input.
  • Warning Zone alerts you to "incoming" and "departing" targets breaking your preset guard zone.
  • Optional ATA (Automatic Tracking Aid) allows you to tracks up to 50 user designated targets. Designate the target and the radar will automatically provide the target distance, speed, bearing, course and closest point of approach on all user targets selected.
  • Displays up to 100 AIS (Automatic Identification System) targets with *newly included* ($500 value) AIS interface.
  • All this advanced radar technology is housed in a sleek, compact waterproof (IPX5 rating) case design that can be mounted almost anywhere.
  • Built-in flush mounting system makes installation easy as you can mount screws from front side of unit
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
SI-TEX T-940-4 4kW 4.5' Open Array Radar T-940-4 SITEX T-940-4 4KW 48NM RADAR 4.5' OPEN ARRAY
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