Simrad AP Autopilot Systems

Simrad AP Autopilot Systems
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Simrad AP24 Autopilot

  • AP24 Control Head
  • AC12 Course Computer with Simkit-1
  • RC42 Rate Compass
  • RPU80 Pump

  • Complete set of Turn Patterns - including Depth Contour Tracking, programmable S-turn, Zig-Zag, Continuous turn, Square patterns and many more.
  • Improved steering algorithms - full Rate Of Turn (ROT) control provides smooth and precise turns in any condition and improves tack and gybe performance on sailboats.
  • No Drift Course - Maintain set Course Over Ground even in severe wind and current conditions.

Simrad AP24 Autopilot combines space saving design with state of the art auto steering, making it the perfect choice when space is at a premium. A new SimNet plug & play network, provides simplified installation and enhanced integration with other Simrad products.

Installation & Integration
Simrad AP24 Autopilot utilizes the Simrad Intelligent Marine Network - SimNet, which features plug and play operation and Slim Line connectors for easy cable routing, so you'll be up and running in very little time. The ability to 'daisy chain' SimNet instruments in any order allows you to use the most efficient cable runs possible when installing the equipment.

Virtual Rudder Feedback
This unique feature, recently introduced to Simrad autopilots means that no rudder feedback unit is needed for outboards and stern drive boats. In terms of installation, you will save a huge amount of time and aggravation thanks to this sophisticated new feature.

Automatic Tuning
Simrad AP24 Autopilot include a number of self calibrating features that automatically compensate for the unique handling characteristics of your boat and sea conditions, insuring optimum performance without the need for expert manual calibration.

Simrad engineering ensures that you can always go to sea in the confidence that your Autopilot is pin-point accurate and highly reliable. The Simrad AP24 Autopilot boasts state of the art technology so you know you'll be safe, you know you'll hit your way points and you know that you'll arrive on time. But what about en-route? What can the Simrad AP24 Autopilot do for you?

Contour Steering
This unique Simrad feature utilizes data from your fishfinder or depth instrument to maintain a set water depth, just as if you were manually steering your boat along depth contours on a paper chart. This leaves you free to concentrate on the big catch, enjoy the shoreline view or trim your sail.

Advanced Wind Steering
The AWS feature provides unbeatable autopilot performance for any sailing vessel. AWS is ideal for single-handed sailing or racing. Utilizing wind and GPS data simultaneously, it is possible to hit long distance waypoints dead-on, without deviating from the original course line or build-up of significant cross track error.

Rate Of Turn Control
Simrad AP24 Autopilot is equipped with advanced control algorithms that enable smooth and precise turns regardless of sea conditions. This feature also improves tack and gybe performance on sailboats.

Data Pages
Simrad AP24 Autopilot includes a number of data pages where you can view autopilot parameters such as compass heading, set course, rudder position, as well as information received from other SimNet compatible equipment such as GPS navigation data and Simrad IS20 Instruments wind, depth and speed data.

Multi-Station Operation
Expanded multi-station compatibility offers several control options including use of Simrad AP28 Autopilot control unit. Any future autopilot control units will also work thanks to the SimNet system.

Control Options
Simrad offers a range of extra display and control options for Simrad AP24 Autopilot:
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Simrad AP Autopilot Systems AP2403VRF AP2403VRF autopilot system with AP24 control head, AC12 course computer, RC42 rate compass and RPU80 pump
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