110609

Solinst Levelogger Spare Black Top Caps

Solinst Levelogger Spare Black Top Caps

Description

Spare black top caps are compatible with the Levelogger Junior, Gold, Edge, LTC, and Barologgers.

Your Price
$19.00
In Stock

Shipping Information
Return Policy
Why Buy From Fondriest?
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Solinst Levelogger Spare Black Top Caps 110609 Levelogger black top caps, pack of 10
$19.00
In Stock

In The News

Wetland water level study skips modern sensor tangle for 1930s method

Environmental sensors can measure almost any physical parameter in nature, but sometimes they can overwhelm the science they are supposed to support. Jason Hill, an assistant professor of engineering at the University of Southern Indiana, wants to create a water level model that will help wetland restorers understand and predict water level fluctuations by studying water loss through the ground and evapotranspiration. The problem is his next project site has too many variables to measure. So, he’s taking an old fashioned route based on empiricism and water level measurement. Hill said that conventional techniques for estimating evapotranspiration require site specific micrometeorological data, like solar radiation, wind speed and vapor pressure.

Read More

Army Corps of Engineers Protects River Wildlife

A complex series of locks and dams up and down the Ohio River enable interstate commerce, travel and recreation by maintaining a usable pathway for watercraft, but come with the inevitable byproducts of disrupting the river’s natural systems. To combat this, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers uses a complex monitoring and response technology designed to minimize the negative impacts of dredging on the river ecosystem. Steven Foster, a limnologist with the Corps Water Quality Team, works at the Robert C. Byrd Lock and Dam in Gallipolis Ferry, West Virginia. He said one key area he focuses on is the welfare of mussels in the river. River dredging can smother mussel beds, so Foster and the team of engineers monitor the beds to ensure their safety.

Read More

Researchers Track Glacial Meltwater On Its Surprising Journey

While the scientific community has formed its consensus on how ice sheets are shrinking in and around Greenland, some researchers are tracking what happens to the meltwater as it drains into the ocean each summer. Their study, published in Nature Geoscience by an interdisciplinary team of biologists, oceanographers and hydrologists, used computer models to simulate the meltwater to see where currents take it and what effect it could have on the ocean. Renato Castelao, one of the researchers and an associate professor of marine science for the University of Georgia, said one of the biggest discoveries of the study was the surprising final destinations of the ice sheets as they melt into the ocean each summer.

Read More