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111939

Solinst DataGrabber Data Transfer Device

Solinst DataGrabber Data Transfer Device

Description

The DataGrabber provides an inexpensive, and very portable option for Levelogger users to download data directly to a USB flash drive.

Features

  • One push-button to download data
  • Compatible with most USB flash drives
  • Connects to a Direct Read Cable or Optical Adaptor
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$181.00
In Stock

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Details

The DataGrabber connects to a Levelogger’s Direct Read Cable; alternatively, a Direct Read to Optical Adaptor allows users to connect it directly to a Levelogger’s optical end. The USB flash drive is plugged into the socket on the front of the DataGrabber.

A push-button on the DataGrabber starts the downloading process. All of the data in the Levelogger’s memory is transferred to the USB device. The DataGrabber comes with a 512 Mb USB flash drive; it is also compatible with most other USB flash drives. The Levelogger is not interrupted if it is still logging. The data in the Levelogger memory is not erased. A light changes color to indicate when the DataGrabber is properly connected, when the data transfer is taking place, and when the data has been successfully downloaded. The DataGrabber uses one 9 volt alkaline or lithium battery that is easy to replace when required.

Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Solinst DataGrabber Data Transfer Device 111939 DataGrabber data transfer device, includes 512MB USB flash drive
$181.00
In Stock
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Solinst Threaded Direct Read to Optical Adapter 112123 Threaded direct read to optical adapter
$57.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Solinst Direct Read Cable Assemblies 110582 Direct read cable assembly, 5'
$80.00
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