109352

Solinst Levelogger Edge Replacement Cases

Solinst Levelogger Edge Replacement Cases

Description

Solinst Levelogger Edge Replacement Cases, pack of 10

Your Price
$15.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

Shipping Information
Return Policy
Why Buy From Fondriest?
What's Included:
  • (10) Solinst Levelogger Edge Replacement Cases
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Solinst Levelogger Edge Replacement Cases 109352 Levelogger Edge Replacement Cases, pack of 10
$15.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

In The News

Wetland water level study skips modern sensor tangle for 1930s method

Environmental sensors can measure almost any physical parameter in nature, but sometimes they can overwhelm the science they are supposed to support. Jason Hill, an assistant professor of engineering at the University of Southern Indiana, wants to create a water level model that will help wetland restorers understand and predict water level fluctuations by studying water loss through the ground and evapotranspiration. The problem is his next project site has too many variables to measure. So, he’s taking an old fashioned route based on empiricism and water level measurement. Hill said that conventional techniques for estimating evapotranspiration require site specific micrometeorological data, like solar radiation, wind speed and vapor pressure.

Read More

Researchers Find Link Between Forest Fires And Health

Researchers from the University of California at Berkeley are figuring out when it comes to forest fires, sometimes you’ve just got to let it burn. Gabrielle Boisramé, a hydrologist with the university, and a team of fellow researchers wanted to figure out if the standard practice of fire suppression would have any impact on the flow of water through the forest. To do so, they used the Illilouette Creek basin of Yosemite National Park as the setting for a natural experiment. In that specific plot, when lightning strikes on dry, hot days and starts a fire, land managers let it burn out on its own, rather than suppress the blaze. Park employees adopted this practice in the area in the 1970s and have stuck with it since then.

Read More

Army Corps of Engineers Protects River Wildlife

A complex series of locks and dams up and down the Ohio River enable interstate commerce, travel and recreation by maintaining a usable pathway for watercraft, but come with the inevitable byproducts of disrupting the river’s natural systems. To combat this, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers uses a complex monitoring and response technology designed to minimize the negative impacts of dredging on the river ecosystem. Steven Foster, a limnologist with the Corps Water Quality Team, works at the Robert C. Byrd Lock and Dam in Gallipolis Ferry, West Virginia. He said one key area he focuses on is the welfare of mussels in the river. River dredging can smother mussel beds, so Foster and the team of engineers monitor the beds to ensure their safety.

Read More