102433

Solinst Model 601 Standpipe Piezometers

Solinst Model 601 Standpipe Piezometers

Description

The Model 601 Standpipe Piezometer is designed to be placed within an open hole.

Features

  • Pointed PVC tip for pushing loose sands or backfilling within test pits
  • Uses a porous plastic filter set inside a perforated PVC body
  • Connects to the surface with 3/4" ID PVC riser pipe connected with slip couplings
Your Price
$18.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

Shipping Information
Return Policy
Why Buy From Fondriest?

Details

The Model 601 Standpipe Piezometer, is the least expensive of the piezometer line, and is designed to be placed within an open hole. The pointed PVC tip is suitable for pushing into very loose sands at the base of a borehole, or for backfilling in place within test pits.

The piezometer uses a porous plastic filter set inside a perforated PVC body. It connects to the surface with 3/4" ID PVC riser pipe connected with slip couplings. The piezometer tips come in a variety of lengths.
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Solinst Model 601 Standpipe Piezometers 102433 Model 601 PVC standpipe piezometer, 6"
$18.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Solinst Model 601 Standpipe Piezometers 100396 Model 601 PVC standpipe piezometer, 1 ft.
$22.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Solinst Model 601 Standpipe Piezometers 101557 Model 601 PVC standpipe piezometer, 2 ft.
$33.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Solinst Model 601 Standpipe Piezometers 100938 Model 601 PVC standpipe piezometer, 3 ft.
$43.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Additional Product Information:

In The News

New map shows significant groundwater depletion in Central California

Groundwater level data collected by a Central California county shows significant drops during the past 12 years, according to a San Luis Obispo Tribune article. Data shows that groundwater has dropped by a minimum of 70 feet from 1997 to 2009 in the Paso Robles area of Central California. In the past four years the areas of most significant decline have expanded north and south. Drought and agricultural withdrawals are the likely culprits for the groundwater decline. Some advocates are calling for more responsible water use by vineyards in the area, while farmers note that the recent drought did not help the situation.

Read More

Too Close for Comfort: About Half of Fracking Wells 2 to 3 km From Domestic Groundwater Systems

If you live in a city, you may take the safety of the water that you drink for granted, although recent developments in Flint may have changed your mind about that. But for 45 million Americans who drink water that comes from private wells, drawn from groundwater and unregulated by a public utility, the question of what's in that water is an even bigger unknown—a potentially dangerous one. In 2016, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released a report indicating that supplies of drinking water near hydraulic-fracturing or fracking sites are more likely to be affected by contamination events. Scott Jasechko and Debra Perrone, Researchers at the University of California Santa Barbara, wanted to find out just how many privately-owned groundwater wells might be at risk.

Read More

In-Home Water Testing: A Talk With the Creator of Tap Score by SimpleWater

In the wake of various water quality crises from Flint, Michigan and Puerto Rico, there is a growing interest and demand among consumers for home water testing. Enter DIY water testing kits like Tap Score by SimpleWater . Tap Score in particular was conceived of and launched by former UC Berkeley grad student John Pujol and co-founder and CTO Julio Rodriguez. “In 2015 we began testing small and rural communities for arsenic in their water,” Pujol explains. “We found it much more frequently than we expected, and also discovered that people in these towns greatly appreciated someone telling them what was in their water and how to fix it.

Read More