103160

Solinst Model 615C Drive-Point Piezometer

Solinst Model 615C Drive-Point Piezometers

Description

Where an air-tight connection is most desirable, the Model 615C's compression fitting allows users to attach 1/4" sample tubing directly to the top of the screened portion of the drive-point.

Features

  • Affordable method to monitor shallow groundwater and soil vapor
  • Attach to inexpensive 3/4" (20 mm) NPT steel drive pipe
  • Can be used for permanent well points or short-term monitoring applications
More Views
Your Price
$90.00
In Stock

Shipping Information
Return Policy
Why Buy From Fondriest?

Details

Solinst Model 615C Drive-Point Piezometer uses a high quality stainless steel piezometer tip, 3/4" NPT pipe for drive extensions and LDPE or Teflon sample tubing, if desired. Combine these with an inexpensive Slide Hammer and you have a complete system.

Where an air-tight connection is most desirable, the compression fitting allows users to attach 1/4" sample tubing directly to the top of the screened portion of the drive-point.
What's Included:
  • (1) Solinst Model 615C Drive-Point Piezometer
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Solinst Model 615C Drive-Point Piezometer 103160 Model 615C drive-point piezometer with 1/4" compression, 6"
$90.00
In Stock
Solinst Model 615C Drive-Point Piezometer 108538 Model 615C drive-point piezometer with 1/4" compression, 12"
$105.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Solinst 101069 Model 615 stainless steel NPT extension, 1 ft.
$15.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Solinst 101070 Model 615 stainless steel NPT extension, 2 ft.
$28.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Solinst 101071 Model 615 stainless steel NPT extension, 3 ft.
$40.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Solinst 102174 Model 615 manual slide hammer, 25 lb.
$160.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Solinst 102932 Model 615 manual drive head assembly, includes drive head, tubing bypass & 2 ft. extension
$149.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

Solinst Model 615C Drive-Point Piezometer Reviews

| Write a Review

Be the first to write a review

In The News

New map shows significant groundwater depletion in Central California

Groundwater level data collected by a Central California county shows significant drops during the past 12 years, according to a San Luis Obispo Tribune article. Data shows that groundwater has dropped by a minimum of 70 feet from 1997 to 2009 in the Paso Robles area of Central California. In the past four years the areas of most significant decline have expanded north and south. Drought and agricultural withdrawals are the likely culprits for the groundwater decline. Some advocates are calling for more responsible water use by vineyards in the area, while farmers note that the recent drought did not help the situation.

Read More

Choosing The Right Thermo Benchtop For Your Project

Thermo Scientific’s Orion Star A line is full of options for completing projects from environmental monitoring to quality control and beyond. These include benchtops like the Orion Versa Star and portables like the Orion Star A329 . Making the right selection is important for ensuring project success, but sometimes choosing a meter can be difficult. To make things a little easier, we talked with Ricki Hartwell, the global product manager for Thermo Scientific’s Orion Laboratory and Field Instruments. She gave some tips to help customers find the best meter to meet their needs. Let’s take a look at her recommendations for benchtops.

Read More

Study Reveals Pollen Particles Impact Cloud Formation

Effects of pollen are largely unexplored when it comes to atmospheric studies because the particles are simply too large. But one team of scientists, driven by curiosity, began researching how smaller pollen particles impact the atmosphere. The research , conducted by scientists from Michigan State University and Texas A&M, revealed that as pollen absorbs moisture, it breaks down into smaller and smaller particles, acting as water collectors. This process is very similar to how clouds form in the atmosphere and further research found that pollen, when exposed to moisture, can produce clouds. To prove their theory, the team used pollen samples from pine, birch, oak, pecan and cedar trees.

Read More