103160

Solinst Model 615C Drive-Point Piezometer

Solinst Model 615C Drive-Point Piezometers

Description

Where an air-tight connection is most desirable, the Model 615C's compression fitting allows users to attach 1/4" sample tubing directly to the top of the screened portion of the drive-point.

Features

  • Affordable method to monitor shallow groundwater and soil vapor
  • Attach to inexpensive 3/4" (20 mm) NPT steel drive pipe
  • Can be used for permanent well points or short-term monitoring applications
More Views
Your Price
$95.00
In Stock

Shipping Information
Return Policy
Why Buy From Fondriest?

Details

Solinst Model 615C Drive-Point Piezometer uses a high quality stainless steel piezometer tip, 3/4" NPT pipe for drive extensions and LDPE or Teflon sample tubing, if desired. Combine these with an inexpensive Slide Hammer and you have a complete system.

Where an air-tight connection is most desirable, the compression fitting allows users to attach 1/4" sample tubing directly to the top of the screened portion of the drive-point.
What's Included:
  • (1) Solinst Model 615C Drive-Point Piezometer
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Solinst Model 615C Drive-Point Piezometer 103160 Model 615C drive-point piezometer with 1/4" compression, 6"
$95.00
In Stock
Solinst Model 615C Drive-Point Piezometer 108538 Model 615C drive-point piezometer with 1/4" compression, 12"
$110.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Solinst 101069 Model 615 stainless steel NPT extension, 1 ft.
$16.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Solinst 101070 Model 615 stainless steel NPT extension, 2 ft.
$28.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Solinst 101071 Model 615 stainless steel NPT extension, 3 ft.
$40.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Solinst 102174 Model 615 manual slide hammer, 25 lb.
$160.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Solinst 102932 Model 615 manual drive head assembly, includes drive head, tubing bypass & 2 ft. extension
$124.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

Solinst Model 615C Drive-Point Piezometer Reviews

| Write a Review

Be the first to write a review

In The News

New map shows significant groundwater depletion in Central California

Groundwater level data collected by a Central California county shows significant drops during the past 12 years, according to a San Luis Obispo Tribune article. Data shows that groundwater has dropped by a minimum of 70 feet from 1997 to 2009 in the Paso Robles area of Central California. In the past four years the areas of most significant decline have expanded north and south. Drought and agricultural withdrawals are the likely culprits for the groundwater decline. Some advocates are calling for more responsible water use by vineyards in the area, while farmers note that the recent drought did not help the situation.

Read More

Data buoy on Acadia National Park's Jordan Pond to help answer clarity questions

Acadia National Park, the oldest national park east of the Mississippi, sits off Maine's Atlantic coast and covers most of Mount Desert Island — an unlikely name for a landmass covered in lakes and ponds. One of those is Jordan Pond, the deepest on the island, which is a famously clear lake in a state famous for clear lakes. "Jordan Pond is historically one of the most transparent lakes in Maine--or at least that's what they claim," said Nora Theodore, a masters student in ecology and environmental science at the University of Maine. And though the lake remains incredibly clear, decades of monitoring show the clarity is trending downward. "It's an extremely low productivity system, but that's been changing," she said. Transparency in Jordan Pond has been in decline since the 1990s.

Read More

Vehicle pollution multiplies in the environment, study finds

Scientists have found that for every particle of pollution directly produced by a vehicle, approximately ten times that amount of pollution is produced by the original particle’s reactions with its environment. Allen Robinson of Carnegie Mellon University collected air from Fort Pitt Tunnel, Pittsburgh, where about 61,000 vehicles pass daily. A tube through a tunnel ventilation slit introduced the vehicle emissions to a potential aerosol mass flow reactor, where hydroxyl radicals oxidized volatile organic compounds produced by the vehicles, mimicking reactions with the atmosphere. About ten times more secondary organic aerosols resulted post reaction versus primary organic aerosols, according to mass spectrometry.

Read More