103160

Solinst Model 615C Drive-Point Piezometer

Solinst Model 615C Drive-Point Piezometers

Description

Where an air-tight connection is most desirable, the Model 615C's compression fitting allows users to attach 1/4" sample tubing directly to the top of the screened portion of the drive-point.

Features

  • Affordable method to monitor shallow groundwater and soil vapor
  • Attach to inexpensive 3/4" (20 mm) NPT steel drive pipe
  • Can be used for permanent well points or short-term monitoring applications
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Your Price
$90.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

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Details

Solinst Model 615C Drive-Point Piezometer uses a high quality stainless steel piezometer tip, 3/4" NPT pipe for drive extensions and LDPE or Teflon sample tubing, if desired. Combine these with an inexpensive Slide Hammer and you have a complete system.

Where an air-tight connection is most desirable, the compression fitting allows users to attach 1/4" sample tubing directly to the top of the screened portion of the drive-point.
What's Included:
  • (1) Solinst Model 615C Drive-Point Piezometer
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Solinst Model 615C Drive-Point Piezometer 103160 Model 615C drive-point piezometer with 1/4" compression, 6"
$90.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Solinst Model 615C Drive-Point Piezometer 108538 Model 615C drive-point piezometer with 1/4" compression, 12"
$105.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Solinst 101069 Model 615 stainless steel NPT extension, 1 ft.
$16.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Solinst 101070 Model 615 stainless steel NPT extension, 2 ft.
$28.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Solinst 101071 Model 615 stainless steel NPT extension, 3 ft.
$41.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Solinst 102174 Model 615 manual slide hammer, 25 lb.
$160.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Solinst 102932 Model 615 manual drive head assembly, includes drive head, tubing bypass & 2 ft. extension
$149.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

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