103160

Solinst Model 615C Drive-Point Piezometer

Solinst Model 615C Drive-Point Piezometers

Description

Where an air-tight connection is most desirable, the Model 615C's compression fitting allows users to attach 1/4" sample tubing directly to the top of the screened portion of the drive-point.

Features

  • Affordable method to monitor shallow groundwater and soil vapor
  • Attach to inexpensive 3/4" (20 mm) NPT steel drive pipe
  • Can be used for permanent well points or short-term monitoring applications
More Views
Your Price
$95.00
In Stock

Shipping Information
Return Policy
Why Buy From Fondriest?

Details

Solinst Model 615C Drive-Point Piezometer uses a high quality stainless steel piezometer tip, 3/4" NPT pipe for drive extensions and LDPE or Teflon sample tubing, if desired. Combine these with an inexpensive Slide Hammer and you have a complete system.

Where an air-tight connection is most desirable, the compression fitting allows users to attach 1/4" sample tubing directly to the top of the screened portion of the drive-point.
What's Included:
  • (1) Solinst Model 615C Drive-Point Piezometer
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Solinst Model 615C Drive-Point Piezometer 103160 Model 615C drive-point piezometer with 1/4" compression, 6"
$95.00
In Stock
Solinst Model 615C Drive-Point Piezometer 108538 Model 615C drive-point piezometer with 1/4" compression, 12"
$110.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Solinst 101069 Model 615 stainless steel NPT extension, 1 ft.
$16.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Solinst 101070 Model 615 stainless steel NPT extension, 2 ft.
$28.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Solinst 101071 Model 615 stainless steel NPT extension, 3 ft.
$40.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Solinst 102174 Model 615 manual slide hammer, 25 lb.
$160.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Solinst 102932 Model 615 manual drive head assembly, includes drive head, tubing bypass & 2 ft. extension
$124.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

Solinst Model 615C Drive-Point Piezometer Reviews

| Write a Review

Be the first to write a review

In The News

New map shows significant groundwater depletion in Central California

Groundwater level data collected by a Central California county shows significant drops during the past 12 years, according to a San Luis Obispo Tribune article. Data shows that groundwater has dropped by a minimum of 70 feet from 1997 to 2009 in the Paso Robles area of Central California. In the past four years the areas of most significant decline have expanded north and south. Drought and agricultural withdrawals are the likely culprits for the groundwater decline. Some advocates are calling for more responsible water use by vineyards in the area, while farmers note that the recent drought did not help the situation.

Read More

Salvage logging can reduce fuel availability for decades after a forest fire, study finds

In spite of the efforts of one talking bear, forest fires happen — pretty frequently, too, with between 60,000 and 80,000 occurring each year in the U.S. Ecologists and foresters recognize that the occasional conflagration carries certain benefits, including improved soil nutrients and growth control. Logging companies, however, tend to see their profits going up in smoke, and often rush to salvage any surviving timber from the charred area. Post-fire logging, known also as salvage logging, is known to impact erosion and runoff rates in some areas. But could the practice also affect the susceptibility of burnt forests to future fires? Researchers with the U.S.

Read More

Warm ocean water gateways add to Antarctic glacier melt

Scientists at the University of Texas have found seafloor gateways that may be allowing warm ocean water to flow underneath a prominent Antarctic glacier, according to a release from the school. The discovery adds a new contributor to ice melt on the continent. The gateways appear to flow beneath the Totten Glacier, one of Antarctica’s most rapidly thinning glaciers. The amount of ice it holds, scientists say, could raise the global sea level by 11 feet if melted. “Now we know the ocean is melting ice in an area of the glacier that we thought was totally cut off before,” said Jamin Greenbaum, a doctoral candidate at the university’s Institute for Geophysics, in a statement. “Knowing this will improve predictions of ice melt and the timing of future glacier retreat.

Read More