107967

Solinst Model 800 Single Point Packers

Solinst Model 800 Single Point Packers

Description

Solinst Model 800 Single Point Packer is primarily for use in 2" to 5" monitoring wells (50 and 125 mm) as single or straddle packers.

Features

  • Designed for isolating discrete zones
  • Can be inflated using a hand pump up to 50 psi
  • Ideal for use with Integra bladder pumps or double valve pumps
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$321.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

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Details

Solinst Model 800 Single Point Packer is primarily for use in 2" to 5" monitoring wells (50 and 125 mm) as single or straddle packers. They can be inflated using a hand pump to a maximum of up to 50 psi (345 kPa).
Notable Specifications:
  • Packer Size OD: 1.8" (46 mm)
  • Access ID: 1/2" (12.7 mm)
  • Gland Length: 23" (584 mm)
  • Overall Length: 29" (737 mm)
  • Borehole Size: 1.9 - 2.4" (48 - 61 mm)
  • Borehole Size with Centralizers: 2.5 - 3.5" (63 - 89 mm)
  • Pipe Fittings: 1/2" NPT Female
What's Included:
  • (1) Solinst Model 800 Single Point Packer
  • Centralizer clamps
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Solinst Model 800 Single Point Packers 107967 Model 800 single point packer with centralizer clamps, 1.8" x 2'
$321.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Solinst Model 800 Single Point Packers 107969 Model 800 single point packer with centralizer clamps, 3.7" x 3'
$625.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Solinst Inflation Valve Assembly 107899 Inflation valve assembly for Model 800 packer, 1/8"
$30.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Solinst High Pressure Hand Pump 101278 High pressure hand pump
$80.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Solinst 107973 Spare centralizer with clamps, 1.8"
$13.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Solinst 108111 Spare centralizer with 1" spacer & ties, 3.7"
$22.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

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