110149

Solinst USB Optical Reader

Solinst USB Optical Reader

Description

The Solinst USB Optical Reader facilitates connection to Levelogger at the office for Levelogger configuration & data upload.

Features

  • Optical reader facilitates connection to Levelogger at office for configuration & data upload
  • Low-cost communication package for direct interface to Leveloggers and Rainloggers
  • Optical reader connects directly to USB port
Your Price
$149.00
In Stock

Shipping Information
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Details

The Solinst USB Optical Reader is compatible with The Levelogger Junior Edge, Levelogger Edge, LTC Levelogger Junior, and the Barologger Edge.
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Solinst USB Optical Reader 110149 USB optical reader
$149.00
In Stock

Questions & Answers

| Ask a Question
I am unable to load the drivers for this onto my computer. Does this reader operate on WinXP or Win7?
Yes, the Solinst USB Optical Reader is compatible with Windows XP and 7. It is recommended to have version 4.1 or newer of the Levelogger Software. This software includes the USB drivers for both XP and Windows, and can be downloaded from www.solinst.com/downloads/. The instructions for installing the optical reader can be found in the Solinst manual, under the Documents tab.


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