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93633-002GR

Stevens Wi-Fi POGO Portable Soil Moisture System

Stevens Wi-Fi POGO Portable Soil Moisture System

Description

The Stevens POGO portable soil moisture sensor makes soil spot sampling quick and easy. Instantly measure soil moisture, electrical conductivity, and temperature.

Features

  • Instantaneous sensor response
  • Compact & rugged for years of use
  • Optimize soil analysis, watering and fertilization
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$2,500.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

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Details

The Stevens Wi-Fi POGO Portable Wireless Soil Sensor puts the power of the popular Stevens Hydra Probe in the palm of your hand and allows for easy soil measurement anywhere. Using built in Wi-Fi, the POGO connects wirelessly with your Apple iPhone, iPod Touch, iPad, or Android smart phones and tablets to collect soil data using the free Stevens HydraMon App, available for download from the Apple App Store or Android Marketplace (search “Stevens Water” or “HydraMon” to find the app). Using the Stevens POGO, you’re free to take soil measurements anywhere at any time, without the time requirements of setting up a permanent soil monitoring system.

With the Stevens HydraMon App taking soil readings is easy. Simply insert the probe  end of the POGO into the soil, select the correct soil type from the menu, and tap the “Sample” button on your Apple/Android device’s screen. The App will display soil temperature, conductivity and dielectric permittivity on-screen for immediate viewing. The user also has the option to log with time and date stamp all sensor measurements to a file with optional GPS location coordinates also recorded. Saved data can then be easily sent via email as a CSV file for further analysis.

The POGO features a rugged, anodized aluminum housing that contains a rechargeable battery pack that powers the Hydra Probe. The POGO also has an LCD screen that indicates battery voltage as well as an on/off switch.

Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Stevens Wi-Fi POGO Portable Soil Moisture System 93633-002GR Wi-Fi POGO portable soil sensor, green
$2500.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Stevens Wi-Fi POGO Portable Soil Moisture System 93633-002BL Wi-Fi POGO portable soil sensor, black
$2500.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Stevens Wi-Fi POGO Portable Soil Moisture System 93633-002RD Wi-Fi POGO portable soil sensor, red
$2500.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Stevens Wi-Fi POGO Portable Soil Moisture System 93633-002BU Wi-Fi POGO portable soil sensor, blue
$2500.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Stevens Wi-Fi POGO Portable Soil Moisture System 93633-002CL Wi-Fi POGO portable soil sensor, aluminum
$2500.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Cedar Tree CT4 Rugged Handheld Computer 25160 CT4 rugged handheld computer, orange. Includes Android 4.2, 1.2 GHz processor, 1 GB RAM, 4 GB Flash memory, 2-4m GPS, 8 MP camera, IP68 rating, Bluetooth, Wi-Fi & GSM communications. Usually ships in 3-5 days
Cedar Tree CT7 Rugged Tablet Computer 25170 CT7 rugged tablet computer, yellow. Includes Android 4.2, 1.2 GHz processor, 1 GB RAM, 16 GB Flash memory, 2-4m GPS, 8 MP camera, IP67 rating, Bluetooth, Wi-Fi & GSM communications. Usually ships in 3-5 days

Questions & Answers

| Ask a Question
To what depth does the probe go into the ground and, therefore, to what depth does it measure to?
This portable soil moisture system is designed for soil surface spot sampling - it will measure soil moisture, conductivity and temperature in the first 2.5" of the soil. The Stevens Wi-Fi POGO has 2.5" prongs that need to be fully inserted into the soil so that the bottom plate of the sensor will also be in contact with the ground.

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