Thermo Orion AQUAfast IV Nitrate HR Reagent Kit

Thermo Orion AQUAfast IV Nitrate HR Reagent Kit


The Orion AQUAfast IV nitrate (high range) reagent kit includes 30 tests.


  • Contained in self-filling vials
  • No need to touch the reagent
  • AUTO-ID eliminates measurement errors
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The Orion AQUAfast IV reagents are contained in self-filling vials. The user never needs to touch the reagents and AUTO-ID eliminates measurement errors.
Notable Specifications:
  • Measurement range: 5 - 60 mg/L
What's Included:
  • (30) Reagent tests
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Thermo Orion AQUAfast IV Nitrate HR Reagent Kit AC4007 Orion AQUAfast IV nitrate (high range) reagent kit, 30 tests
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