F4023CH6

Thermos FUNtainer Stainless Steel, Insulated Straw Bottle - Charcoal - 16 oz.

Thermos FUNtainer Stainless Steel, Insulated Straw Bottle - Charcoal - 16 oz.
Your Price
$18.99
In Stock

Shipping Information
Return Policy
Why Buy From Fondriest?

Details

FUNtainer™ Stainless Steel, Insulated Straw Bottle - Charcoal - 16 oz.

Constructed with double wall stainless steel, this 16 ounce straw bottle is virtually unbreakable and built to withstand the demands of everyday use. Featuring a hygienic, push-button lid, this straw bottle is easy to open and drink from. Also included on the lid is an integrated, flip-up carrying loop. The FUNtainer Straw Bottle comes equipped with a breakaway lid designed to simply snap off if accidentally dropped while the lid is open. The lid can then be easily snapped back into place, making this a great, worry-free choice for parents and kids alike. In order to maximize the incredible insulation technology, it is recommended to pre-chill the bottle just prior to use. This can be accomplished by filling the bottle with cold tap water, attaching the lid and letting it rest for a few minutes. Before you are ready to use, simply empty the water and fill with your favorite beverage. Attaching the lid will further increase the thermal efficiency.

Features:
  • Vacuum insulation technology for maximum temperature retention, not for use with hot liquids
  • Durable stainless steel interior and exterior
  • Hygienic push button lid with pop-up straw and integrated carry handle
  • Keeps cold 12 hours
  • 16 ounce capacity; hand washing recommendedrinks refreshingly cold for up to 12 hours
  • Durable stainless steel interior and exterior withstand the demands of everyday use; Hand wash recommended
  • Hygienic push button lid with pop-up silicone straw is easy to use
  • Flip-up carrying loop


Specifications:
  • 16 ounce capacity
  • Measures 2.6"W x 2.6"D x 8.6"H
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Thermos FUNtainer Stainless Steel, Insulated Straw Bottle - Charcoal - 16 oz. F4023CH6 THERMOS FUNTAINER SS INSULATED STRAW BOTTLE 16OZ CHARCOAL
$18.99
In Stock

In The News

Latest Satellite and Eddy Covariance Data Shows Vulnerability of Trees to Drought

William Anderegg, assistant professor of biology at the University of Utah, has spent years studying drought-stricken trees all over the world. As climate change is expected to cause increased drought severity in the future, the work of Anderegg and his colleagues becomes increasingly important. In a previous interview for the Environmental Monitor , Anderegg found that a tree’s hydraulic safety margin was the best indicator of whether a tree would survive drought. The hydraulic safety margin is an expression of how the tree reacts under drought conditions, where there is very little water being pulled up the tree’s transport system and air is being pulled up instead. “It’s like a heart attack for the tree,” he noted.

Read More

A Balancing Act In The Grand Canyon: The High Flow Experiments

You've probably heard of the Four Corners region of the United States; that's where the corners of Arizona, New Mexico, Utah and Colorado meet at one point. These same four states are also part of the Colorado River Storage Project (CRSP), which began to change the face of the American West in 1956, enabling the population explosions in places like Phoenix and Los Angeles to continue thanks to usable water. Glen Canyon Dam is 220 meters high and 480 meters wide, and this massive structure has changed this section of the Colorado River all the way to Lake Mead dramatically. It has also increased low-flow magnitudes, decreased peak flow magnitudes and volumes and caused fluctuations in daily discharge levels that the area relies upon for generation of hydroelectric power.

Read More

Climate Change May Thwart Sunlight's Ability To Disinfect Water

Waterborne illnesses are striking the American citizens of Puerto Rico in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria — and healthcare professionals are concerned that these diseases could reach epidemic levels on the island, already devastated by the storm and still without power and drinking water in many places. Several recent fatalities in Puerto Rico died of leptospirosis, a bacterial disease that is typically waterborne. Authorities including scientists at the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) are now investigating more than 70 suspected cases of leptospirosis. However, even under normal conditions, waterborne illnesses are a problem, right here in the US.

Read More