PG2AAA-101-00

Trimble PG200 GNSS Receiver

Trimble PG200 GNSS Receiver

Description

The Trimble PG200 (also branded as Trimble R1) is a rugged, compact GNSS receiver that provides professional-grade positioning information to any connected mobile device using Bluetooth.

Features

  • Small, rugged, lightweight GNSS receiver for great mobility
  • Bluetooth connection to iOS, Android, and Windows devices
  • Optional ViewPoint RTX provides submeter accuracy via IP or satellite
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$2,495.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days

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Details

Purpose-built for mapping and GIS professionals in a variety of organizations, including environmental agencies, government departments, and utility companies, the standalone Trimble PG200 receiver enables you to collect higher-accuracy location data with the device you already use—whether it is a modern smart device, such as a mobile phone or tablet, or a traditional integrated data collection handheld or tablet.

The PG200 supports multiple GNSS constellations, including GPS, GLONASS, Galileo, QZSS and BeiDou, to provide a truly global solution. The PG200 receiver includes the ability to utilize SBAS, Trimble ViewPointTM RTX or VRS correction sources to suit the location and business requirements - providing accurate GNSS information almost anywhere on earth. The Trimble ViewPoint RTX service provides global sub-meter accuracy, using IP cellular where coverage is available, or over satellite L-band, even in remote locations.

The small size and light weight of the PG200 makes it easy for the mobile worker to carry without worrying about bulky equipment. The palm-sized device can easily be carried in a pocket or hung on a belt, using the optional belt pouch. The intuitive GNSS Status software allows configuration of real time corrections and provides status information, conforming to device platform standards (iOS, Microsoft, or Android). GNSS Status will connect to any PG200 once it has been paired. IP65 rated environmental protection and military-spec 810G certified ruggedness make the PG200 ideal for professional outdoor use.

Flexible and practical, accurate and rugged—the innovative Trimble PG200 GNSS receiver delivers professional-level positions to everyone.

Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Trimble PG200 GNSS Receiver PG2AAA-101-00 PG200 GNSS receiver bundle
$2495.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Trimble PG200 External GNSS Patch Antenna ACCAA-315 PG200 external GNSS patch antenna, 1.5m cable
$39.00
In Stock
Trimble PG200 Belt Clip Pouch ACCAA-621 PG200 belt clip pouch
$30.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Trimble PG200 Pole Pouch ACCAA-758 PG200 pole pouch
$30.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
SECO GIS Backpack 43048 GIS backpack with cam-lock antenna pole
$216.95
In Stock
SECO Quick-Release Prism Pole 43035 Quick-release one-section prism pole, extends 1.5m to 2.6m
$175.95
In Stock
SECO Thumb-Release Bipod 43693 Thumb-release bipod
$172.95
In Stock
SECO Thumb-Release Tripod 43675 Thumb-release tripod
$130.95
Usually ships in 3-5 days
RAM Mount Tough-Claw Base w/Long Double Socket Arm & Universal X-Grip Cradle w/1" Ball f/7" Tablets RAM-B-400-C-UN8U Tough-Claw, Small with Long Double Socket Arm and Universal X-Grip Cradle with 1" Ball for 7" Tablets
$80.99
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Cedar CT5 Rugged Handheld Computer 26580 CT5 rugged handheld computer. Includes Android 6.0, 3 GB RAM, 32 GB internal storage, 2-4m GPS, 5 MP front/13 MP rear camera, IP68 rating, Bluetooth, Wi-Fi & 4G LTE communications.
$499.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Cedar CT7G Rugged Tablet Computer 26500 CT7G rugged tablet computer. Includes Android 6.0, 2 GB RAM, 16 GB internal storage, 2-4m GPS, 2 MP front/13 MP rear camera, IP68 rating, Bluetooth, Wi-Fi & 4G LTE communications.
$899.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days

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