HM70D4A1A0AB

Vaisala HM70 Handheld Humidity Meter

Vaisala HM70 Handheld Humidity Meter

Description

The Vaisala HM70 Handheld Humidity Meter is a user-friendly meter for demanding spot-checking humidity and temperature measurements.

Features

  • User-friendly meter with numerical and graphical display of measurements
  • Data can be logged and transferred to PC via MI70 Link software
  • Three probes options with temperature measurement ranges between -70 and +180 degrees C
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Details

The Vaisala HM70 Handheld Humidity Meter is a user-friendly meter for demanding spot-checking humidity measurements. It is ideal for field-checking and calibration of Vaisala's fixed humidity instruments.

Three probe options are available to meet a variety of applications. The HMP75 is a general purpose probe for humidity measurements between -20 and +60 decrees C. The HMP76 is a long, stainless steel probe for humidity measurements between -50 and +120 degrees C. It is especially suitable for spot-checking in ducts. The HMP77 is a small probe at the end of a 5m cable. The probe is ideal for difficult-to-reach areas and for on-site calibration of Vaisala's process transmitters. The measurement range is for temperatures up to +180 degrees C.

The Vaisala HM70 incorporates the latest generation of the Vaisala HUMICAP Sensor. Its proven reliable and high performance humidity measurement ability is combined with long-term stability. The meter is calibrated at the factory against traceable standards, and delivered with a calibration certificate. The HM70 is also available with accredited calibration. The HM70 probes can be sent to a Vaisala Service Center for a traceable recalibration.

The HM70 has two probe inputs for simultaneous multi-parameter measurements. The HM70 supports the use of Vaisala's dewpoint, carbon dioxide and moisture in oil probes. The menu-based interface is easy to use, and a graphical LCD display with internal data logger makes data management quick and convenient. The included MI70 Link Windows software with USB interface cable allows the user to upload data to a PC for further analysis.
What's Included:
  • (1) Vaisala HM70 handheld humidity meter
  • (1) AC battery charger
  • (1) MI70 Link software CD
  • (1) USB interface cable
  • (1) Operations manual
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Vaisala HM70 Handheld Humidity Meter HM70D4A1A0AB HM70 handheld humidity & temperature meter with HMP75 sensor, 1.9m cable Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Vaisala HM70 Handheld Humidity Meter HM70D4B1A0AB HM70 handheld humidity & temperature meter with HMP76 sensor, 1.9m cable
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Vaisala HM70 Handheld Humidity Meter HM70D4D1A0AB HM70 handheld humidity & temperature meter with HMP77 sensor, 1.9m cable (5m probe cable)
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Vaisala MI70CASE Carrying case Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
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Vaisala HM70 Handheld Humidity Meter Reviews

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Questions & Answers

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Can I monitor data on my PC?
It is possible to monitor HM70 readings directly with a PC by using the MI70 Link program and USB interface cable that come with the meter. It is easy to transfer logged and real time measurement data from the HM70 to a PC.
What parameters can be displayed?
The HM70 humidity meter can display relative humidity, temperature, dew point, absolute humidity, wet bulb and much more. Up to three measurements can be displayed at at time

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