PTB1101B0AB

Vaisala PTB110 Barometer

Vaisala PTB110 Barometer

Description

The Vaisala PTB110 barometer is designed both for accurate barometric pressure measurements and for general environmental pressure monitoring.

Features

  • Minimizes or even removes the need for field adjustment in many applications
  • Low power consumption makes it ideal for data logger applications
  • Includes standard installation & pressure fitting
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Details

The Vaisala PTB110 Barometer is designed both for accurate barometric pressure measurements at a room temperature and for general environmental pressure monitoring over a wide temperature range.

The sensor uses a silicon capacitive absolute pressure sensor that combines the outstanding elasticity characteristics and mechanical stability of single-crystal silicon with the proven capacitive detection principle. The excellent long-term stability of the barometer minimizes or even removes the need for field adjustment in many applications.

The Vaisala PTB110 Barometer is suitable for a variety of applications, such as environmental pressure monitoring, data buoys, laser interferometers, and in agriculture and hydrology. The compact Vaisala PTB110 is especially ideal for data logger applications as it has low power consumption. Also an external On/Off control is available. This is practical when the supply of electricity is limited.
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Vaisala PTB110 Barometer PTB1101B0AB PTB110 barometric pressure sensor, 500-1100 hPa, 0-2.5 VDC Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Vaisala PTB110 Barometer PTB1101A0AB PTB110 barometric pressure sensor, 500-1100 hPa, 0-5 VDC
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

Questions & Answers

| Ask a Question
What is the response time of this barometer?
The PTB110 will reach full accuracy 500ms after a pressure step.

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