Vaisala RS-232/485-to-USB Cable Adapter

Vaisala RS-232/485-to-USB Cable Adapter


The Vaisala RS-232/485-to-USB cable adapter is designed for permanent PC-based applications with the WXT520 or WMT52 sensors.


  • Converts RS-232 or RS-485 signal to USB for direct PC connection
  • M12 connector for connection to WXT520 weather sensor or WSP152 surge protector
  • 1.4m cable length for easy access to sensor
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  • (1) Vaisala RS-232/485-to-USB Cable Adapter
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Vaisala RS-232/485-to-USB Cable Adapter 220782 RS-232/485-to-USB cable adapter with 8-pin M12 female connector, 1.4m In Stock
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Vaisala WSP152 Surge Protector WSP152 Surge protector for host PC (e.g. USB connection). Includes M12 connectors. For use with 220782 and 215952. In Stock
Vaisala 8-pin M12 Cable with Dual Connectors 215952 8-pin M12 cable with female & male connectors, 10m In Stock

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