77914

Watermark Professional Secchi Disc Kit

Watermark Professional Secchi Disc Kit

Description

This professional 20cm diameter secchi disc is made of polycarbonate with black and white quadrants.

Features

  • Includes detachable 24 oz. zinc sounding weight.
  • Silk screened black and white quadrants
  • 20cm diameter polycarbonate disc
Your Price
$133.48
Usually ships in 3-5 days

Shipping Information
Return Policy
Why Buy From Fondriest?

Details

The WaterMark professional 20cm diameter secchi disc is made of polycarbonate with silk screened black and white quadrants.
Notable Specifications:
  • 20cm diameter polycarbonate disc
  • 24 oz. zinc sounding weight (detachable)
  • 20m length of calibrated polypropylene line at 0.5m graduations
What's Included:
  • (1) Secchi disc
  • (1) 24 oz. zinc sounding weight
  • (1) Hand reel
  • (1) 20m length of calibrated polypropylene line at 0.5m graduations
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Watermark Professional Secchi Disc Kit 77914 Professional secchi disc kit, heavy-duty
$133.48
Usually ships in 3-5 days

In The News

Secchi Dip-in encourages citizen monitoring this summer

A monitoring initiative named for Secchi disks encourages people across the world to test the water nearby from the end of June through mid-July. It’s called the Secchi Dip-in and its organizers want anyone with the means to test their local water to do so and report back.  The database is open to contributions from June 29 through July 21. Volunteers, monitoring groups and professionals alike can contribute data to the Secchi Dip-in database.  Turbidity data is the main information Secchi Dip-in organizers want to see, but they won’t turn down any kind of water quality data people contribute. They encourage interested environmentalists to go out with someone who is experienced in testing for water quality to ensure data is accurate.

Read More

Army Corps of Engineers Protects River Wildlife

A complex series of locks and dams up and down the Ohio River enable interstate commerce, travel and recreation by maintaining a usable pathway for watercraft, but come with the inevitable byproducts of disrupting the river’s natural systems. To combat this, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers uses a complex monitoring and response technology designed to minimize the negative impacts of dredging on the river ecosystem. Steven Foster, a limnologist with the Corps Water Quality Team, works at the Robert C. Byrd Lock and Dam in Gallipolis Ferry, West Virginia. He said one key area he focuses on is the welfare of mussels in the river. River dredging can smother mussel beds, so Foster and the team of engineers monitor the beds to ensure their safety.

Read More

Researchers Track Glacial Meltwater On Its Surprising Journey

While the scientific community has formed its consensus on how ice sheets are shrinking in and around Greenland, some researchers are tracking what happens to the meltwater as it drains into the ocean each summer. Their study, published in Nature Geoscience by an interdisciplinary team of biologists, oceanographers and hydrologists, used computer models to simulate the meltwater to see where currents take it and what effect it could have on the ocean. Renato Castelao, one of the researchers and an associate professor of marine science for the University of Georgia, said one of the biggest discoveries of the study was the surprising final destinations of the ice sheets as they melt into the ocean each summer.

Read More