77926

Watermark Surber-Type Stream Bottom Sampler

Watermark Surber-Type Stream Bottom Sampler

Description

The surber-type stream bottom sampler is used for semi-quantitative analysis of benthic stream organisms.

Features

  • Can be used in silt or large cobble
  • Substrates are agitated to dislodge insects while water flow transports animals into plankton net
  • Heavy-duty 500 micron mesh net
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$500.14
Usually ships in 3-5 days

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Details

Used for semi-quantitative analysis of benthic stream organisms, this WaterMark surber type stream bottom sampler can be used in silt or large cobble. Substrates contained within the 12" x 12" folding brass frame are agitated to dislodge insects, while water flow transports animals into plankton net.

A durable Nitex mesh net is supported by perpendicular frame members and has built-in, clear polycarbonate cod-end assembly with latex tubing and pinch clamp.
Notable Specifications:
  • 12" x 12" folding brass frame
What's Included:
  • (1) 12" x 12" folding brass frame
  • (1) Nitex mesh net
  • (1) Nylon carrying bag
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Watermark Surber-Type Stream Bottom Sampler 77926 Surber-type stream bottom sampler, 500 micron mesh net
$500.14
Usually ships in 3-5 days

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