605375

YSI 130 Temperature Electrode

YSI 130 Temperature Electrode

Description

YSI 130 is a temperature electrode & 1m cable for use with the pH100 and pH100A handheld display.

List Price
$55.00
Your Price
$52.25
Usually ships in 3-5 days

Shipping Information
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Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
YSI 130 Temperature Electrode 605375 130 temperature electrode, 1m cable
$52.25
Usually ships in 3-5 days

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