605203

YSI 2003 Polarographic Dissolved Oxygen Sensor

YSI 2003 Polarographic Dissolved Oxygen Sensor

Description

The YSI 2003 polarographic dissolved oxygen sensor provides reliable DO readings and includes the 5908 yellow 1.25 mil PE membrane kit.

Features

  • Dissolved oxygen sensor for the YSI Pro Series handheld meters
  • Easily inserts into the probe module and cable assembly
  • Compatible with YSI 5906, 5908, or 5909 screw-on cap membranes
List Price
$185.00
Your Price
$175.75
In Stock

Shipping Information
Return Policy
Why Buy From Fondriest?

Details

The YSI 2003 is designed for use with the Pro20, Pro20i, Pro1020, Pro2030, and Pro Plus instruments; cables must be ordered separately. It can be used on 60520 (DO), 6052030 (DO/conductivity), 6051020 (DO/ISE), and 605790 Quatro (DO/conductivity/ISE/ISE) cables.

The YSI 2003 comes with six membrane caps and bottle of solution.

Notable Specifications:
  • 1-year warranty
What's Included:
  • (1) YSI 2003 DO module
  • (1) 5908 cap membrane kit
  • (1) Instruction sheet
  • (1) Hex wrench
  • (1) Set screw
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
YSI 2003 Polarographic Dissolved Oxygen Sensor 605203 2003 polarographic DO sensor with yellow 1.25 mil PE membrane kit, Pro Series
$175.75
In Stock
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
YSI 5908 DO Cap Membrane Kit 605306 5908 PE yellow 1.25 mil cap membrane kit, 550A, DO200, 559 & 2003 polarographic sensors
$57.00
In Stock
Additional Product Information:

Questions & Answers

| Ask a Question
How does a Polarographic DO sensor work?
In a polarographic sensor, the cathode is gold and the anode is silver. The system is completed by a circuit in the instrument that applies a constant voltage of 0.8 volts to the probe, which polarizes the two electrodes. The sensor operates by detecting a change in this current caused by the variable pressure of oxygen while the potential is held constant at 0.8 V. The more oxygen passing through the membrane and being reduced at the cathode, the greater the signal increases.
Why is the Polarographic sensor warranted for 1 year while the Galvanic is only warranted to 6 months.
Galvanic sensors continually consume the anode, even when the instrument is off. The consumption of the polarographic sensor stops when the instrument is turned off, giving it a longer sensor life.
Is this sensor approved by the EPA?
Yes, the proven technology of the steady-state sensor is approved by the US EPA for compliance monitoring and reporting.

Related Products

In The News

Mississippi Gulf Coast fish kill expected to continue

Officials at the Mississippi Department of Marine Resources say that a recent fish kill along the state’s Gulf coast is the largest they’ve seen, according to KVUE . The fish kill has brought dead crabs, eels and stingrays ashore. Beachgoers were disturbed by the large-scale kill, but experts explained that conditions this year were to blame. With higher temperatures and low dissolved oxygen near the sea floor, creatures that live there were more likely to be affected. The fish kill, beginning July 1, was the first of 2013 for the area. It was expected to last several more days, but lessen over that period.

Read More

Guardians of the Riverbank: Planting Trees to Protect Water Quality and Wildlife

In fall of 2017, the Connecticut River Conservancy (CRC) along with their project partners improved more than 9,000 feet of riverbank by planting 5,690 native trees and shrubs to protect the Connecticut River and its tributaries. The trees now guard against erosion and pollution on seven farms in New Hampshire and Vermont, and expand the existing habitat for local wildlife. This kind of project is part of CRC's core work. In August of 2011, Hurricane Irene roared up the East Coast of the United States, leaving a tell-tale path of destruction behind. Listed as the eighth-costliest hurricane in American history, the storm also hurt the watershed of the Connecticut River.

Read More

University of Toronto Doctoral Student Sees Environmental Monitoring Future in Internet of Things

Researchers face many difficulties. Assessing the ecological health of large geographic regions, especially those with a low population and few research facilities, is one of the many challenges scientists face. One such region is the Ottawa River in Canada, nearly 800 miles long with an overall drainage area of 55,000 square miles. Not only is it vast, but there are few human inhabitants and few research outposts. While gathering representative water samples in such a region is difficult enough, there is also the challenge of responding in a timely manner when problems arise.

Read More