603059

YSI 3059 Flow Cell

YSI 3059 Flow Cell

Description

The YSI 3059 flow cell is ideal for use in applications when it is impossible or undesirable to submerge the probe module into the sample.

Features

  • YSI 3059 is designed for low-flow purging and sampling in groundwater monitoring wells or very shallow water
  • Compatible with YSI Pro Series, 556, 600XL, & 600XLM multi-parameter instruments
  • Accommodates both 1/4" and 3/8" tube fittings
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List Price
$335.00
Your Price
$318.25
Usually ships in 3-5 days

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Details

Installation of the YSI 3059 flow cell is easy. Simply thread the flow cell on to the probe module of the Pro Series dual port assembly, 5563 or the 600 XL/XLM. Once secure, water can be pumped to the flow cell with a user-supplied pump. Water enters through the bottom of the flow cell, and passes through a diffuser plate. The water will leave through an opening at the top of the cell. This design ensures that flow is distributed evenly through the cell, eliminating dead zones of no flow along the sides.

YSI 3059 includes two each of 1/4 in and 3/8 in tube fittings. Tubing and pump not included.

Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
YSI 3059 Flow Cell 603059 3059 flow cell, 203mL
$318.25
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
YSI Flow Cell Tube Replacement O-Ring 603088 Replacement O-ring for flow cell tube, Models 3059, 3076 & 3077 (two required)
$2.68
In Stock
YSI 3056 Flow Cell Mounting Spike 603056 3056 flow cell mounting spike
$28.50
Usually ships in 3-5 days
YSI 3078 Flow Cell Adapter 603078 3078 flow cell adapter, single port
$92.15
Usually ships in 3-5 days

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