059800

YSI 5905 BOD Probe

YSI 5905 BOD Probe

Description

The YSI Model 5905 BOD (Biochemical Oxygen Demand) probe is used for measuring dissolved oxygen in all popular size BOD bottles.

Features

  • Compatible with many YSI DO meters, including Models 52 & 58
  • Uses "fool-proof", screw-on cap membranes
  • Refurbishable electrode system
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List Price
$725.00
Your Price
$688.75
In Stock

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Details

The YSI 5905 BOD (Biochemical Oxygen Demand) probe is used for measuring dissolved oxygen in all popular size BOD bottles. This probe features self-stirring, an easily replaced membrane cap, and a refurbishable electrode system.

The YSI 5905 probe is designed for use with YSI Models 52 and 58, and for Models 5000 and 5100 when used with the 5011 adapter. The 5905 BOD probe comes with a power supply cord and a 5906 cap membrane kit.
What's Included:
  • (1) Self-stirring BOD probe
  • (1) Power supply
  • (1) 5906 cap membrane kit
  • (1) Operations manual
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
YSI 5905 BOD Probe 059800 5905 BOD probe, self-stirring, 5' cable
$688.75
In Stock
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
YSI 5906 DO Cap Membrane Kit 059880 5906 Teflon black 1.0 mil cap membrane kit, 85, 5905, 5010, 5239, 559 & 2003 polarographic sensors
$57.00
In Stock
YSI 5011 Cable Adapter 005011 5011 cable adapter for 5905, 5739, 5239, & 5750 probes
$94.05
Usually ships in 3-5 days
YSI BOD Analyst Pro Software 625120 5120 BOD Analyst Pro software
$565.25
Usually ships in 3-5 days
YSI 58 Dissolved Oxygen Meter 069194 58 dissolved oxygen meter, 115VAC
$2042.50
Usually ships in 3-5 days

YSI 5905 BOD Probe Reviews

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Questions & Answers

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I turned on the YSI 5100 meter which has a YSI 5905 probe attached. The reading came up all zeros. Turned off and on a few times, wiggled the cord and it corrected itself. What could be the cause?
It sounds like there is a short in the cable that is causing a communication issue between the probe and the meter. We can evaluate the probe at no cost to verify the failure. Click the Support link above for instructions on returning the probe for evaluation.
How is the probe powered?
The 5905 probe is powered by an attached DO meter. However, the stir paddle must be plugged into its power adaptor to operate, as it is not powered by the meter.
What meters is this BOD probe compatible with?
The 5905 BOD probe is compatible with four YSI dissolved oxygen meters: Models 52, 58, 5000 and 5100 . If used with benchtop models 5000 or 5100, the YSI 5011 adaptor is required.

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