1 mS

YSI Conductivity Standards

YSI Conductivity Standards

Description

NIST-traceable conductivity solutions to calibrate both field instruments and lab instruments and cells together for maximum accuracy.

Features

  • Calibrates full line of YSI conductivity meters
  • Available in pints, quarts, and boxes of 8-pint bottles
  • Designed and manufactured to the highest quality standards
Your Price
$17.00
In Stock

Shipping Information
Return Policy
Why Buy From Fondriest?

Details

YSI Conductivity Calibrator Solutions are secondary standard solutions for the calibration of conductivity cells together with conductance meters. The solutions are provided in two ranges of accuracy. The YSI 3161, 3163, and 3165 solutions are made to close tolerances and intended primarily for use in laboratory applications where other factors which strongly influence conductivity can also be tightly controlled or accurately measured. The YSI 3160, 3167, 3168, and 3169 solutions are made to less exacting tolerances and are intended mainly for use in field applications where other factors are less subject to close control or measurement.

Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
YSI Conductivity Standards 1 mS Conductivity standard, 1,000 uS, 1 pint
$17.00
In Stock
YSI Conductivity Standards 065270 3161 conductivity standard, 1,000 uS, 1 quart
$68.40
In Stock
YSI Conductivity Standards 065272 3163 conductivity standard, 10,000 uS, 1 quart
$68.40
Usually ships in 3-5 days
YSI Conductivity Standards 065274 3165 conductivity standard, 100,000 uS, 1 quart
$68.40
Usually ships in 3-5 days
YSI Conductivity Standards 060907 3167 conductivity standard, 1,000 uS, 8 pints
$117.80
In Stock
YSI Conductivity Standards 060906 3160 conductivity standard, 1,413 uS, 8 pints
$117.80
Usually ships in 3-5 days
YSI Conductivity Standards 060911 3168 conductivity standard, 10,000 uS, 8 pints
$117.80
In Stock
YSI Conductivity Standards 060660 3169 conductivity standard, 50,000 uS, 8 pints
$117.80
In Stock

In The News

What is Conductivity?

UPDATE : Fondriest Environmental is offering their expertise in conductivity through their new online knowledge base. This resource provides an updated and comprehensive look at conductivity and why it is important to water quality. To learn more, check out: Conductivity, Salinity and TDS . Salinity and conductivity  measure the water's ability to conduct electricity, which provides a measure of what is dissolved in water. In the SWMP data, a higher conductivity value indicates that there are more chemicals dissolved in the water. Conductivity measures the water's ability to conduct electricity. It is the opposite of resistance. Pure, distilled water is a poor conductor of electricity.

Read More

Army Corps of Engineers Protects River Wildlife

A complex series of locks and dams up and down the Ohio River enable interstate commerce, travel and recreation by maintaining a usable pathway for watercraft, but come with the inevitable byproducts of disrupting the river’s natural systems. To combat this, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers uses a complex monitoring and response technology designed to minimize the negative impacts of dredging on the river ecosystem. Steven Foster, a limnologist with the Corps Water Quality Team, works at the Robert C. Byrd Lock and Dam in Gallipolis Ferry, West Virginia. He said one key area he focuses on is the welfare of mussels in the river. River dredging can smother mussel beds, so Foster and the team of engineers monitor the beds to ensure their safety.

Read More

Researchers Track Glacial Meltwater On Its Surprising Journey

While the scientific community has formed its consensus on how ice sheets are shrinking in and around Greenland, some researchers are tracking what happens to the meltwater as it drains into the ocean each summer. Their study, published in Nature Geoscience by an interdisciplinary team of biologists, oceanographers and hydrologists, used computer models to simulate the meltwater to see where currents take it and what effect it could have on the ocean. Renato Castelao, one of the researchers and an associate professor of marine science for the University of Georgia, said one of the biggest discoveries of the study was the surprising final destinations of the ice sheets as they melt into the ocean each summer.

Read More