Zebra-Tech Campbell Scientific OBS-3+ Hydro-Wiper

Zebra-Tech Campbell Scientific OBS-3+ Hydro-Wiper


The Zebra-Tech Campbell Scientific OBS-3+ Hydro-Wiper self-contained Hydro-Wiper C is a field-proven, high performance wiping system designed for the Campbell Scientific OBS-3+ turbidity sensors.


  • Highly effective brush technology for both marine and fresh water
  • Precision on-board clock for accurate wipe interval timing
  • Simple sensor installation and operation with user-replaceable brush
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Why Buy From Fondriest?


The Zebra-Tech Campbell Scientific OBS-3+ Hydro-Wiper is a mechanical wiper system designed to fit easily to the D&A OBS-3+ turbidity sensor. Using a regular gentle brushing action, the Hydro-Wiper keeps the optical window of the instrument clean from bio-fouling and other unwanted deposits. The Hydro-Wiper reduces the need for costly site visits to manually clean the instrument, maintaining data integrity throughout long deployments.
What's Included:
  • (1) Zebra-Tech Campbell Scientific OBS-3+ Hydro-Wiper
  • (1) Field kit
  • (1) Operations manual
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Zebra-Tech Campbell Scientific OBS-3+ Hydro-Wiper C-SC-001-030 Self-contained Hydro-Wiper for Campbell Scientific OBS-3+ turbidity sensor, 30m depth rating
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

Zebra-Tech Campbell Scientific OBS-3+ Hydro-Wiper Reviews

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Questions & Answers

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What happens if the wiper arm gets jammed?
If the wiper arm gets jammed during the wipe, the direction of the rotation will be reversed in an attempt to dislodge the obstruction. If this does not work , the Hydro-Wiper will abort the wipe. The diagnostic LED will flash twice every 15 seconds if this occurs.
My LED indicator light is blinking, what does this mean?
One blink every 15 seconds means the wiper is functioning normally. Two blinks every 15 seconds means the previous wipe failed. Three blinks every 15 seconds means the wiper is in low battery shutdown.

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