Airmar 110WXS Ultrasonic WeatherStation Instrument

The model 110WXS is Airmar’s entry level solution for stationary, land-based weather monitoring applications.

Features

  • Ultrasonic measurement of apparent and wind speed and angle
  • Solar radiation shield provides stable, accurate temperature and relative humidity data
  • Additional parameters: barometric pressure, calculated dew point, heat index and wind chill
List Price $822.00
Your Price $780.90
In Stock
Airmar
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Airmar 110WXS Ultrasonic WeatherStation Instrument110WXS-RS422-100317 110WXS Ultrasonic WeatherStation, temperature, pressure, humidity & wind with NMEA 0183 (RS422) & NMEA 2000 (CAN Bus) output
$780.90
In Stock
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Airmar NMEA 0183 Output Cable 33-619-01 NMEA 0183 output cable with bare leads, 10m
$57.00
In Stock
Airmar NMEA 0183 Output Cable 33-862-02 NMEA 0183 output cable with connector for USB data converter, 10m
$61.75
In Stock
Airmar USB Data Converter 33-801-01 USB data converter for WX Series instruments
$152.00
In Stock

The model 110WXS is Airmar’s entry level solution for stationary, land-based weather monitoring applications. A complete multisensor WeatherStation, the 110WXS features a solar radiation shield for increased accuracy and stability of temperature and relative humidity. Ultrasonic wind measurement of wind speed and angle is virtually maintenance-free with no moving parts to wear out. Barometric pressure, as well as calculated wind chill and heat index round out the critical parameters being measured. The durable, rugged housing is IPX4 rated and designed to be deployed as an integral component for land-based stations.

  • (1) 110WXS WeatherStation
  • (1) Post mount with 1-14 UNS threads
  • (1) WeatherCaster Software CD
  • (1) Calibration Certificate
  • (1) Owner's Manual
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