AMS Sand Sludge Sediment Probe

With a core catcher, the AMS Sand Sludge Sediment Probe is ideal for conducting research on loose soil samples, as well as ensuring full sample recovery.

Features

  • Includes seven different probe parts
  • Completely replaceable tip
  • Can be used in a variety of unconsolidated soils and sands
Your Price $208.58
Drop ships from manufacturer
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
AMS Sand Sludge Sediment Probe424.37 Sand sludge sediment probe
$208.58
Drop ships from manufacturer
AMS Sand Sludge Sediment Probe
424.37
Sand sludge sediment probe
Drop ships from manufacturer
$208.58
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
AMS 425.04 1" X 24" Plastic Liner
$2.78
Drop ships from manufacturer
AMS Liner Caps 425.18 Plastic liner end cap, 1"
$0.41
Drop ships from manufacturer
AMS Replaceable Sand Probe Tip 56799 Replaceable sand probe tip
$34.20
Drop ships from manufacturer
AMS
425.04
1" X 24" Plastic Liner
Drop ships from manufacturer
$2.78
AMS Liner Caps
425.18
Plastic liner end cap, 1"
Drop ships from manufacturer
$0.41
AMS Replaceable Sand Probe Tip
56799
Replaceable sand probe tip
Drop ships from manufacturer
$34.20
The AMS Sand Sludge Sediment probe is ideal for conducting research on a wide range of unconsolidated soils and sands. A core catcher ensures full sample recovery. Each probe's tip is guaranteed to be completely replaceable. With seven different parts included, this probe offers versatility and affordability.
  • (1) 1 1/4" x 24" Probe body
  • (1) 1" Core catcher
  • (1) 10" Gripped cross handle
  • (1) 1" x 24" Plastic liner
  • (2) 1" Plastic end caps
  • (1) Replaceable tip
Questions & Answers
No Questions
Please, mind that only logged in users can submit questions

In The News

Dutch researchers to explore seldom-seen deep water reefs

A deep water reef off the coast of a small island in the Dutch Caribbean will be explored at depths yet to be seen by scientists, according to a press release from the Netherlands’ Wageningen University . The researchers will be mapping biodiversity and collecting samples from reefs off the coast of Bonaire. They plan to travel as deep as 300 meters to observe the biodiverse and mostly unexplored reefs. A submersible from Bonaire’s Curacao Public Aquarium will take researchers down to do their observations. The sub's sediment core sampler will help the team analyze sediment in the reefs. Biological samples will be analyzed and their DNA will be coded in a molecular lab in the Netherelands’ Naturalis Biodiversity Center.

Read More

Lake Superior Algal Blooms Surprise, Highlight Need for More Monitoring

In 2012, for maybe the first time, Lake Superior got scummy. Visitors to the Apostle Islands National Lakeshore reported algae washing up on shore around the park.  It was a marked shift for the park, made up of a portion of the Lake Superior lakeshore and nearby islands. The water surrounding the park is cold, clear and typically low in nutrients: a combination unlikely to result in algal blooms. But, in 2012 and again in 2018 after violent storms, major algal blooms—ones observed over multiple days—washed ashore and clogged the beaches with unsightly, scummy algae. Not the usual suspects The algal blooms of Lake Superior are not the algal blooms of warmer, more nutrient-rich lakes like Lake Erie.

Read More

Unprecedented Changes are a New Challenge for Lake Tanganyika

*This is part two of a series on changing ancient lakes. See part one, Lake Baikal, here . Ancient lakes are facing a suite of rapid, unprecedented anthropogenic changes. While ancient lakes are spread around the world and vary widely from lake to lake, their incredible age, which can reach into the tens of millions of years, makes them unique resources to science. They host incredible biodiversity and long sediment records. They are vital sources of food and water for millions of people. In a changing world, ancient lakes’ value as scientific and natural resources and the incredibly diverse life they contain is under threat.

Read More