AMS Sand Sludge Sediment Probe

With a core catcher, the AMS Sand Sludge Sediment Probe is ideal for conducting research on loose soil samples, as well as ensuring full sample recovery.

Features

  • Includes seven different probe parts
  • Completely replaceable tip
  • Can be used in a variety of unconsolidated soils and sands
Your Price $208.58
Drop ships from manufacturer
AMS
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
AMS Sand Sludge Sediment Probe424.37 Sand sludge sediment probe
$208.58
Drop ships from manufacturer
AMS Sand Sludge Sediment Probe
424.37
Sand sludge sediment probe
Drop ships from manufacturer
$208.58
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
AMS 425.04 1" X 24" Plastic Liner
$2.78
Drop ships from manufacturer
AMS Liner Caps 425.18 Plastic liner end cap, 1"
$0.41
Drop ships from manufacturer
AMS Replaceable Sand Probe Tip 56799 Replaceable sand probe tip
$34.20
Drop ships from manufacturer
AMS
425.04
1" X 24" Plastic Liner
Drop ships from manufacturer
$2.78
AMS Liner Caps
425.18
Plastic liner end cap, 1"
Drop ships from manufacturer
$0.41
AMS Replaceable Sand Probe Tip
56799
Replaceable sand probe tip
Drop ships from manufacturer
$34.20
The AMS Sand Sludge Sediment probe is ideal for conducting research on a wide range of unconsolidated soils and sands. A core catcher ensures full sample recovery. Each probe's tip is guaranteed to be completely replaceable. With seven different parts included, this probe offers versatility and affordability.
  • (1) 1 1/4" x 24" Probe body
  • (1) 1" Core catcher
  • (1) 10" Gripped cross handle
  • (1) 1" x 24" Plastic liner
  • (2) 1" Plastic end caps
  • (1) Replaceable tip
Questions & Answers
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