AMS Sand and Silt Dredge

The AMS 5 lb. sand/silt dredge is a great tool for grab sampling sand or silt.

Features

  • Made entirely from 300 series stainless steel
  • Hinged scissor jaw design with a trigger mechanism
  • 6" x 7 1/2" jaw opening
Your Price $216.40
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
AMS Sand and Silt Dredge445.70 5 lb SST Dredge
$216.40
Drop ships from manufacturer
The AMS sand silt dredge is made entirely from 300 series stainless steel. It features a hinged scissor jaw design with a trigger mechanism that holds the sampler open until it contacts the surface to be sampled. Raising the dredge closes the scissor jaws to collect the sample.
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