206.10

AMS Frozen Soil Powered Auger Kit

AMS Frozen Soil Powered Auger Kit

Description

The AMS Frozen Soil Powered Auger Kit is designed to chew through tough frozen soil.

Features

  • Takes core samples down to a depth of 3 feet
  • Cores through frozen soil conditions
  • Pulls relatively undisturbed cores inside the barrel
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$883.80
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Details

The Frozen Soil Powered Auger Kit gets through those dreaded frozen soil conditions down to a depth of 3 feet. The Core Barrel Auger is equipped with carbide cutting teeth that are specifically designed to chew through tough frozen soil and pull relatively undisturbed cores inside the barrel.The kit utilizes the AMS Hex Quick Pin connection system which allows users to quickly connect & disconnect the extensions from the core barrel. The kit is designed to work with an SDS-Max rotary hammer drill, but may be adapted to a Tanaka TIA-350PFS Gas Drill for added portability.

What's Included:
  • (1) Core barrel auger
  • (2) Threaded/hex quick pin adapters
  • (1) SDS-Max rotary hammer drill adapter
  • (1) Idaho spoon cleanout tool
  • (1) SST cleaning brush
  • (1) Hard-sided carrying case
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
AMS Frozen Soil Powered Auger Kit 206.10 Frozen soil powered auger kit
$883.80
Drop ships from manufacturer

Questions & Answers

| Ask a Question
How large of a sample can the Frozen soil powered auger kit recover?
The slot length on the core barrel allows you to grab 8" of sample recovery at a time.
Can I use any drill?
The Frozen Soil Powered Auger Kit is designed to work with an SDS-max rotary hammer drill, but may be adapted to a Tanaka TIA-350PFS Gas Drill for added portability.

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